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Cofactors

Cofactors Cofactors Do They Influence HIV Infection and Progression? By Kristin White who have seen many AIDS patients have developed some working truisms: "The drug abuser who continues to shoot up has the worst prognosis of all." "Indigent patients don't do well." "AIDS patients with supportive families fare better than those who are alone in the world." These clinical cliches are not supported, as yet, by hard laboratory data or epidemiological studies, but few in the AIDS field would contradict the basic proposition that variables such as other infectious agents, the patient's nutritional status, and the effects of stress can influence the pace, and perhaps the direction, of HTV's course. The most often used term for a variable of this kind is "cofactor." Although hard evidence is care most health professionals scanty, use the term in the context of HIV. The CDC speaks not of cofactors, but of risks—items associated with a greater chance of becoming infected, or with a poorer clinical course. The well known behavioral risk factors are consistent with ordinary common sense—they involve increasing the number of opportunities to become infected, and expediting the movement of the fragile virus from the infected person's body into the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Cofactors

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (3) – Jun 1, 1989

Cofactors

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (3) – Jun 1, 1989

Abstract

Cofactors Do They Influence HIV Infection and Progression? By Kristin White who have seen many AIDS patients have developed some working truisms: "The drug abuser who continues to shoot up has the worst prognosis of all." "Indigent patients don't do well." "AIDS patients with supportive families fare better than those who are alone in the world." These clinical cliches are not supported, as yet, by hard laboratory data or epidemiological studies, but few in the AIDS field would contradict the basic proposition that variables such as other infectious agents, the patient's nutritional status, and the effects of stress can influence the pace, and perhaps the direction, of HTV's course. The most often used term for a variable of this kind is "cofactor." Although hard evidence is care most health professionals scanty, use the term in the context of HIV. The CDC speaks not of cofactors, but of risks—items associated with a greater chance of becoming infected, or with a poorer clinical course. The well known behavioral risk factors are consistent with ordinary common sense—they involve increasing the number of opportunities to become infected, and expediting the movement of the fragile virus from the infected person's body into the

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1989.3.24
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cofactors Do They Influence HIV Infection and Progression? By Kristin White who have seen many AIDS patients have developed some working truisms: "The drug abuser who continues to shoot up has the worst prognosis of all." "Indigent patients don't do well." "AIDS patients with supportive families fare better than those who are alone in the world." These clinical cliches are not supported, as yet, by hard laboratory data or epidemiological studies, but few in the AIDS field would contradict the basic proposition that variables such as other infectious agents, the patient's nutritional status, and the effects of stress can influence the pace, and perhaps the direction, of HTV's course. The most often used term for a variable of this kind is "cofactor." Although hard evidence is care most health professionals scanty, use the term in the context of HIV. The CDC speaks not of cofactors, but of risks—items associated with a greater chance of becoming infected, or with a poorer clinical course. The well known behavioral risk factors are consistent with ordinary common sense—they involve increasing the number of opportunities to become infected, and expediting the movement of the fragile virus from the infected person's body into the

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Jun 1, 1989

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