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Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS?

Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS? Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS? By Jill Stein partment of medicine at States medical schools have taken a uniform approach to not educating students about AIDS. Schools in cities with a high number of HIV-infected patients have, not surprisingly, made the most aggressive changes, although the adaptations are generally more subtle than overt. Essentially, they have integrated AIDS discussions with the standard curriculum. Dr. Martin Pops, associate dean for student and curricular affairs at the University of California-Los Angeles medical school, describes the approach in this fashion: "We prefer keeping the superstructure of the curriculum intact." On the other end of the spectrum, medical schools located in cities with, at least for now, extremely low infection rates have thus far made United School of Medicine in Baltimore. "We believe the best approach to teaching students about medicine is to instruct them about different body systems the skin, heart, lung, kidneys, and so on —rather than focusing on certain disease entities," he says. Diseases frequently affect so many organ systems that an interdisciplinary approach is the only feasible one, he adds. "Pulmonologists, for example, have to be on the lookout for the pulmonary manifestations of AIDS, dermatologists must http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS?

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (4) – Aug 1, 1989

Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS?

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (4) – Aug 1, 1989

Abstract

Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS? By Jill Stein partment of medicine at States medical schools have taken a uniform approach to not educating students about AIDS. Schools in cities with a high number of HIV-infected patients have, not surprisingly, made the most aggressive changes, although the adaptations are generally more subtle than overt. Essentially, they have integrated AIDS discussions with the standard curriculum. Dr. Martin Pops, associate dean for student and curricular affairs at the University of California-Los Angeles medical school, describes the approach in this fashion: "We prefer keeping the superstructure of the curriculum intact." On the other end of the spectrum, medical schools located in cities with, at least for now, extremely low infection rates have thus far made United School of Medicine in Baltimore. "We believe the best approach to teaching students about medicine is to instruct them about different body systems the skin, heart, lung, kidneys, and so on —rather than focusing on certain disease entities," he says. Diseases frequently affect so many organ systems that an interdisciplinary approach is the only feasible one, he adds. "Pulmonologists, for example, have to be on the lookout for the pulmonary manifestations of AIDS, dermatologists must

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1989.3.29
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Are Medical Students Learning About AIDS? By Jill Stein partment of medicine at States medical schools have taken a uniform approach to not educating students about AIDS. Schools in cities with a high number of HIV-infected patients have, not surprisingly, made the most aggressive changes, although the adaptations are generally more subtle than overt. Essentially, they have integrated AIDS discussions with the standard curriculum. Dr. Martin Pops, associate dean for student and curricular affairs at the University of California-Los Angeles medical school, describes the approach in this fashion: "We prefer keeping the superstructure of the curriculum intact." On the other end of the spectrum, medical schools located in cities with, at least for now, extremely low infection rates have thus far made United School of Medicine in Baltimore. "We believe the best approach to teaching students about medicine is to instruct them about different body systems the skin, heart, lung, kidneys, and so on —rather than focusing on certain disease entities," he says. Diseases frequently affect so many organ systems that an interdisciplinary approach is the only feasible one, he adds. "Pulmonologists, for example, have to be on the lookout for the pulmonary manifestations of AIDS, dermatologists must

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Aug 1, 1989

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