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An In Vitro Versus In Vivo Toxicogenomic Investigation of Prenatal Exposures to Tobacco Smoke

An In Vitro Versus In Vivo Toxicogenomic Investigation of Prenatal Exposures to Tobacco Smoke AbstractApproximately 1 million women smoke during pregnancy despite evidence demonstrating serious juvenile and/or adult diseases being linked to early-life exposure to cigarette smoke. Susceptibility could be determined by factors in previous generations, that is, prenatal or “maternal” exposures to toxins. Prenatal exposure to airborne pollutants such as mainstream cigarette smoke has been shown to induce early-life insults (i.e., gene changes) in Offspring that serve as biomarkers for disease later in life. In this investigation, we have evaluated genome-wide changes in the lungs of mouse Dams and their juvenile Offspring exposed prenatally to mainstream cigarette smoke. An additional lung model was tested alongside the murine model, as a means to find an alternative in vitro, human tissue-based replacement for the use of animals in medical research. Our toxicogenomic and bioinformatic results indicated that in utero exposure altered the genetic patterns of the fetus, which could put them at greater risk for developing a range of chronic illnesses in later life. The genes altered in the in vitro, cell culture model were reflected in the murine model of prenatal exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke. The use of alternative in vitro models derived from human medical waste tissues could be viable options to achieve human end-point data and conduct research that meets the remits for scientists to undertake the 3Rs practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied In Vitro Toxicology Mary Ann Liebert

An In Vitro Versus In Vivo Toxicogenomic Investigation of Prenatal Exposures to Tobacco Smoke

An In Vitro Versus In Vivo Toxicogenomic Investigation of Prenatal Exposures to Tobacco Smoke

Applied In Vitro Toxicology , Volume 4 (4): 10 – Dec 1, 2018

Abstract

AbstractApproximately 1 million women smoke during pregnancy despite evidence demonstrating serious juvenile and/or adult diseases being linked to early-life exposure to cigarette smoke. Susceptibility could be determined by factors in previous generations, that is, prenatal or “maternal” exposures to toxins. Prenatal exposure to airborne pollutants such as mainstream cigarette smoke has been shown to induce early-life insults (i.e., gene changes) in Offspring that serve as biomarkers for disease later in life. In this investigation, we have evaluated genome-wide changes in the lungs of mouse Dams and their juvenile Offspring exposed prenatally to mainstream cigarette smoke. An additional lung model was tested alongside the murine model, as a means to find an alternative in vitro, human tissue-based replacement for the use of animals in medical research. Our toxicogenomic and bioinformatic results indicated that in utero exposure altered the genetic patterns of the fetus, which could put them at greater risk for developing a range of chronic illnesses in later life. The genes altered in the in vitro, cell culture model were reflected in the murine model of prenatal exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke. The use of alternative in vitro models derived from human medical waste tissues could be viable options to achieve human end-point data and conduct research that meets the remits for scientists to undertake the 3Rs practices.

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 2017, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers
ISSN
2332-1512
eISSN
2332-1539
DOI
10.1089/aivt.2016.0041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractApproximately 1 million women smoke during pregnancy despite evidence demonstrating serious juvenile and/or adult diseases being linked to early-life exposure to cigarette smoke. Susceptibility could be determined by factors in previous generations, that is, prenatal or “maternal” exposures to toxins. Prenatal exposure to airborne pollutants such as mainstream cigarette smoke has been shown to induce early-life insults (i.e., gene changes) in Offspring that serve as biomarkers for disease later in life. In this investigation, we have evaluated genome-wide changes in the lungs of mouse Dams and their juvenile Offspring exposed prenatally to mainstream cigarette smoke. An additional lung model was tested alongside the murine model, as a means to find an alternative in vitro, human tissue-based replacement for the use of animals in medical research. Our toxicogenomic and bioinformatic results indicated that in utero exposure altered the genetic patterns of the fetus, which could put them at greater risk for developing a range of chronic illnesses in later life. The genes altered in the in vitro, cell culture model were reflected in the murine model of prenatal exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke. The use of alternative in vitro models derived from human medical waste tissues could be viable options to achieve human end-point data and conduct research that meets the remits for scientists to undertake the 3Rs practices.

Journal

Applied In Vitro ToxicologyMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 2018

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