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An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS

An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS Point of View An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS By Mary Fisher incredible doctor's appointment last week, I thought about not standing up when introduced this morning. But I hate being rude, and my motivation for staying seated was not very noble: I merely wanted a few doctors to wait to hear me, as long as they've occasionally waited to see me. How does an AIDS patient look at AIDS? This question may be a good place to begin. Because things are not always as they seem, or as we choose to describe them. I have asked journalists across America to go easy on the term "victim"—as in their description of me as "an AIDS victim." I do not get up in the morning, aim some milk at my children's cereal bowl, and wonder what kind of victim I will be today. I am a woman—a woman living with AIDS, but nonetheless a woman—not a victim. Then there is the title of this guest editorial: "An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS." Press offices may have some form on which I am described as a an After in my day-to-day life, any more than you are "readers." I am http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

Abstract

Point of View An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS By Mary Fisher incredible doctor's appointment last week, I thought about not standing up when introduced this morning. But I hate being rude, and my motivation for staying seated was not very noble: I merely wanted a few doctors to wait to hear me, as long as they've occasionally waited to see me. How does an AIDS patient look at AIDS? This question may be a good place to begin. Because things are not always as they seem, or as we choose to describe them. I have asked journalists across America to go easy on the term "victim"—as in their description of me as "an AIDS victim." I do not get up in the morning, aim some milk at my children's cereal bowl, and wonder what kind of victim I will be today. I am a woman—a woman living with AIDS, but nonetheless a woman—not a victim. Then there is the title of this guest editorial: "An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS." Press offices may have some form on which I am described as a an After in my day-to-day life, any more than you are "readers." I am

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1994 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
Point of View
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1994.8.304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Point of View An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS By Mary Fisher incredible doctor's appointment last week, I thought about not standing up when introduced this morning. But I hate being rude, and my motivation for staying seated was not very noble: I merely wanted a few doctors to wait to hear me, as long as they've occasionally waited to see me. How does an AIDS patient look at AIDS? This question may be a good place to begin. Because things are not always as they seem, or as we choose to describe them. I have asked journalists across America to go easy on the term "victim"—as in their description of me as "an AIDS victim." I do not get up in the morning, aim some milk at my children's cereal bowl, and wonder what kind of victim I will be today. I am a woman—a woman living with AIDS, but nonetheless a woman—not a victim. Then there is the title of this guest editorial: "An AIDS Patient Looks at AIDS." Press offices may have some form on which I am described as a an After in my day-to-day life, any more than you are "readers." I am

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1994

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