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AIDS in the Family

AIDS in the Family Point of View AIDS in the • • • Family from the hospital in Denver. He had gone there because he had lost about a quarter of the sight in his left eye. The doctors hadn't been able to find an immediate cause, so they tested him for CMV and HIV. CMV was responsible for the flakes he saw in his eye, and he was not only seropositive but also had already developed AIDS. The news was even a heavier blow to him because concern about AIDS had long ago led him to make adjustments in his lifestyle to lessen the risk of exposure to the AIDS virus. With every symptom-free year, his fears had eased a little. He had never had himself tested because of possible negative social repercussions and because there was no effective treatment anyway. Many of his friends had died of AIDS and the lives of many others were totally dominated by a medical regimen. Every day they had to go to the hospital: for a test, a check-up, or an intake interview for an experiment. For Gerard this would have meant a move to Denver leaving behind everything he was attached to: his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

AIDS in the Family

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

AIDS in the Family

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Abstract

Point of View AIDS in the • • • Family from the hospital in Denver. He had gone there because he had lost about a quarter of the sight in his left eye. The doctors hadn't been able to find an immediate cause, so they tested him for CMV and HIV. CMV was responsible for the flakes he saw in his eye, and he was not only seropositive but also had already developed AIDS. The news was even a heavier blow to him because concern about AIDS had long ago led him to make adjustments in his lifestyle to lessen the risk of exposure to the AIDS virus. With every symptom-free year, his fears had eased a little. He had never had himself tested because of possible negative social repercussions and because there was no effective treatment anyway. Many of his friends had died of AIDS and the lives of many others were totally dominated by a medical regimen. Every day they had to go to the hospital: for a test, a check-up, or an intake interview for an experiment. For Gerard this would have meant a move to Denver leaving behind everything he was attached to: his

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
Point of View
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1991.5.273
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Point of View AIDS in the • • • Family from the hospital in Denver. He had gone there because he had lost about a quarter of the sight in his left eye. The doctors hadn't been able to find an immediate cause, so they tested him for CMV and HIV. CMV was responsible for the flakes he saw in his eye, and he was not only seropositive but also had already developed AIDS. The news was even a heavier blow to him because concern about AIDS had long ago led him to make adjustments in his lifestyle to lessen the risk of exposure to the AIDS virus. With every symptom-free year, his fears had eased a little. He had never had himself tested because of possible negative social repercussions and because there was no effective treatment anyway. Many of his friends had died of AIDS and the lives of many others were totally dominated by a medical regimen. Every day they had to go to the hospital: for a test, a check-up, or an intake interview for an experiment. For Gerard this would have meant a move to Denver leaving behind everything he was attached to: his

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1991

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