Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

AIDS and Electronic Communications News

AIDS and Electronic Communications News AIDS PATIENT in CARE/DECEMBER 1994 tant to chlorination, and to tolerate relatively high temperatures. It may be that raising the water temperature will have no effect on particular has been shown to be resisany kind of disinfection, including MAC organisms. Recommendations AIDS and Electronic The current recommended approach to the prevention of M. avium in AIDS patients is to use rifabutin chemoprophylaxis in patients with CD4 counts less than 100. Rifabutin is 50 percent effective in preventing disseminated MAC for patients with CD4 counts less than 200. However, rifabutin prophylaxis is limited, according to the researchers. It reportedly is not completely effective in preventing MAC bacteremia and shows no statistically significant survival benefit among patients given prophylaxis. Moreover, there are concerns about the potential impact of inadvertent administration of rifabutin to patients with active tuberculosis or disseminated MAC on mycobacterial drug resistance patterns; the drug's side effects, including uveitis; the potential for a wide variety of drug interactions with rifabutin; and the cost of the drug. The findings from this study suggest that specific identification and avoidance of environmental sources of M. avium infection in AIDS patients might supplement the partial protection afforded by chemoprophylaxis. The researchers recommend http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

AIDS and Electronic Communications News

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

AIDS and Electronic Communications News

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

Abstract

AIDS PATIENT in CARE/DECEMBER 1994 tant to chlorination, and to tolerate relatively high temperatures. It may be that raising the water temperature will have no effect on particular has been shown to be resisany kind of disinfection, including MAC organisms. Recommendations AIDS and Electronic The current recommended approach to the prevention of M. avium in AIDS patients is to use rifabutin chemoprophylaxis in patients with CD4 counts less than 100. Rifabutin is 50 percent effective in preventing disseminated MAC for patients with CD4 counts less than 200. However, rifabutin prophylaxis is limited, according to the researchers. It reportedly is not completely effective in preventing MAC bacteremia and shows no statistically significant survival benefit among patients given prophylaxis. Moreover, there are concerns about the potential impact of inadvertent administration of rifabutin to patients with active tuberculosis or disseminated MAC on mycobacterial drug resistance patterns; the drug's side effects, including uveitis; the potential for a wide variety of drug interactions with rifabutin; and the cost of the drug. The findings from this study suggest that specific identification and avoidance of environmental sources of M. avium infection in AIDS patients might supplement the partial protection afforded by chemoprophylaxis. The researchers recommend

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mary-ann-liebert/aids-and-electronic-communications-news-Nalibb2jO7
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1994 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1994.8.343
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AIDS PATIENT in CARE/DECEMBER 1994 tant to chlorination, and to tolerate relatively high temperatures. It may be that raising the water temperature will have no effect on particular has been shown to be resisany kind of disinfection, including MAC organisms. Recommendations AIDS and Electronic The current recommended approach to the prevention of M. avium in AIDS patients is to use rifabutin chemoprophylaxis in patients with CD4 counts less than 100. Rifabutin is 50 percent effective in preventing disseminated MAC for patients with CD4 counts less than 200. However, rifabutin prophylaxis is limited, according to the researchers. It reportedly is not completely effective in preventing MAC bacteremia and shows no statistically significant survival benefit among patients given prophylaxis. Moreover, there are concerns about the potential impact of inadvertent administration of rifabutin to patients with active tuberculosis or disseminated MAC on mycobacterial drug resistance patterns; the drug's side effects, including uveitis; the potential for a wide variety of drug interactions with rifabutin; and the cost of the drug. The findings from this study suggest that specific identification and avoidance of environmental sources of M. avium infection in AIDS patients might supplement the partial protection afforded by chemoprophylaxis. The researchers recommend

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.