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Topical retinoids: exploring the mechanisms of action and medical aesthetic applications

Topical retinoids: exploring the mechanisms of action and medical aesthetic applications Although the skin is able to naturally rejuvenate itself, this process significantly slows with age, leaving the skin progressively thinner, drier and less elastic. Skin ageing is dependent on a number of factors, which can lead to alterations of structure, function and appearance; however, solar ultraviolet radiation is undoubtedly the most influential factor. Topical retinoids are used to treat an array of dermatological conditions owing to their ability to address several inflammatory and keratitis dermatoses. Moreover, retinoids are able to normalise abnormal growth, differentiation and hyperkeratinisation, and have significant anti-inflammatory effects. All-trans retinol is considered to be a weaker form of the prescription tretinoin; it is now commonly found in over-the-counter cosmetic products and is marketed as being able to produce a more youthful appearance by reducing wrinkles, firming the skin and counteracting photoageing. However, the ‘retinoid reaction’ is a common adverse affect experienced while using topical retinoids, where effects include itching, erythema, burning at site of application and peeling. Having said that, topical tretinoin has been shown to have no effect on endogenous plasma levels or its metabolites and, in the past 30 years, no systemic side effects have been noted with its use in young adults. This article will explore the structure, mechanisms of action and cosmetic applications of topical retinoids, also looking at the marked differences between types. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Topical retinoids: exploring the mechanisms of action and medical aesthetic applications

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 2 (2): 8 – Mar 1, 2013

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2013.2.2.68
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the skin is able to naturally rejuvenate itself, this process significantly slows with age, leaving the skin progressively thinner, drier and less elastic. Skin ageing is dependent on a number of factors, which can lead to alterations of structure, function and appearance; however, solar ultraviolet radiation is undoubtedly the most influential factor. Topical retinoids are used to treat an array of dermatological conditions owing to their ability to address several inflammatory and keratitis dermatoses. Moreover, retinoids are able to normalise abnormal growth, differentiation and hyperkeratinisation, and have significant anti-inflammatory effects. All-trans retinol is considered to be a weaker form of the prescription tretinoin; it is now commonly found in over-the-counter cosmetic products and is marketed as being able to produce a more youthful appearance by reducing wrinkles, firming the skin and counteracting photoageing. However, the ‘retinoid reaction’ is a common adverse affect experienced while using topical retinoids, where effects include itching, erythema, burning at site of application and peeling. Having said that, topical tretinoin has been shown to have no effect on endogenous plasma levels or its metabolites and, in the past 30 years, no systemic side effects have been noted with its use in young adults. This article will explore the structure, mechanisms of action and cosmetic applications of topical retinoids, also looking at the marked differences between types.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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