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The ageing hand, part one: volumisation using dermal fillers and autologous fat

The ageing hand, part one: volumisation using dermal fillers and autologous fat Following the trend of facial rejuvenation, and as patients increasingly notice a discrepancy between having a youthful face and aged hands, aesthetic practitioners are more commonly receiving requests for hand-enhancing procedures. Hand rejuvenation addresses the effects of both intrinsic and extrinsic ageing, and may involve a number of modalities. Intrinsic ageing affects the deep soft-tissue planes, manifesting as decreased skin elasticity, reduced dermal vascularity, and a loss of soft-tissue volume in the form of atrophy of dermal and subcutaneous fat. Replacing lost volume in the dorsum of the hand can provide a more youthful appearance by decreasing skin laxity and wrinkling, and by disguising the prominence of underlying structures, such as veins, bones and tendons. This first article in a two-part series will look at options for volumisation of the ageing hand using different types of dermal fillers and autologous fat. The effects of extrinsic ageing and techniques for skin rejuvenation, as they relate to the hands, will be covered in part two. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

The ageing hand, part one: volumisation using dermal fillers and autologous fat

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 7 (4): 9 – May 2, 2018

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2018.7.4.190
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Following the trend of facial rejuvenation, and as patients increasingly notice a discrepancy between having a youthful face and aged hands, aesthetic practitioners are more commonly receiving requests for hand-enhancing procedures. Hand rejuvenation addresses the effects of both intrinsic and extrinsic ageing, and may involve a number of modalities. Intrinsic ageing affects the deep soft-tissue planes, manifesting as decreased skin elasticity, reduced dermal vascularity, and a loss of soft-tissue volume in the form of atrophy of dermal and subcutaneous fat. Replacing lost volume in the dorsum of the hand can provide a more youthful appearance by decreasing skin laxity and wrinkling, and by disguising the prominence of underlying structures, such as veins, bones and tendons. This first article in a two-part series will look at options for volumisation of the ageing hand using different types of dermal fillers and autologous fat. The effects of extrinsic ageing and techniques for skin rejuvenation, as they relate to the hands, will be covered in part two.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: May 2, 2018

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