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Stigmatisation and societal pressure in patients with skin conditions

Stigmatisation and societal pressure in patients with skin conditions Skin conditions, such as psoriasis, rosacea and eczema, are associated with psychological comorbidities, including body dysmorphic disorder, depression, anxiety and suicidality. Those affected by these conditions report stigmatisation and social pressure. One way in which they are affected is in their diet. The inter-reationship between diet and skin conditions has a pathological basis. However, this is made more complex by the increasing influence of the media, including social media. The information that patients receive online is often not evidence-based and may lead to individuals manipulating their diets to treat and manage their skin conditions. Support from healthcare professionals is vital for treating or managing skin conditions, while also providing additional psychosocial intervention and support, where necessary. This article seeks to raise awareness of the perceived stigmatisation of those with a skin condition and the associated resulting behaviours. It will further reflect and discuss on the source and impact of pressures on diet, specifically disordered eating, and associated psychosocial concerns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Stigmatisation and societal pressure in patients with skin conditions

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 8 (5): 5 – Jun 2, 2019

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2019.8.5.212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Skin conditions, such as psoriasis, rosacea and eczema, are associated with psychological comorbidities, including body dysmorphic disorder, depression, anxiety and suicidality. Those affected by these conditions report stigmatisation and social pressure. One way in which they are affected is in their diet. The inter-reationship between diet and skin conditions has a pathological basis. However, this is made more complex by the increasing influence of the media, including social media. The information that patients receive online is often not evidence-based and may lead to individuals manipulating their diets to treat and manage their skin conditions. Support from healthcare professionals is vital for treating or managing skin conditions, while also providing additional psychosocial intervention and support, where necessary. This article seeks to raise awareness of the perceived stigmatisation of those with a skin condition and the associated resulting behaviours. It will further reflect and discuss on the source and impact of pressures on diet, specifically disordered eating, and associated psychosocial concerns.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Jun 2, 2019

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