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Prevention versus correction: how young is too young for botulinum toxin injections?

Prevention versus correction: how young is too young for botulinum toxin injections? In 2011, there was widespread condemnation and public outrage when Californian mother Kerry Campbell reported injecting her eight-year-old daughter with botulinum toxin to increase her chance of becoming a successful beauty pageant queen. In the UK, there was further controversy following the antics of Sarah Budge, known as the human Barbie doll, who presented her seven-year-old daughter with a voucher for surgical breast augmentation to be used when she reached 16 years of age. Sarah also admitted that her 17-year-old daughter was already having botulinum toxin injections. There is clear consensus in society that these events are not acceptable, and it is a ethical and moral challenge for aesthetic practitioners when a young person seeks and often insists on having botulinum toxin injections when there is no clinical evidence of facial ageing. This paper will discuss prevention (primary prophylaxis) versus correction (secondary prophylaxis) of facial wrinkles and tackle the question ‘how young is too young for botulinum toxin injections?’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Prevention versus correction: how young is too young for botulinum toxin injections?

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 2 (5): 8 – Jun 1, 2013

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2013.2.5.216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 2011, there was widespread condemnation and public outrage when Californian mother Kerry Campbell reported injecting her eight-year-old daughter with botulinum toxin to increase her chance of becoming a successful beauty pageant queen. In the UK, there was further controversy following the antics of Sarah Budge, known as the human Barbie doll, who presented her seven-year-old daughter with a voucher for surgical breast augmentation to be used when she reached 16 years of age. Sarah also admitted that her 17-year-old daughter was already having botulinum toxin injections. There is clear consensus in society that these events are not acceptable, and it is a ethical and moral challenge for aesthetic practitioners when a young person seeks and often insists on having botulinum toxin injections when there is no clinical evidence of facial ageing. This paper will discuss prevention (primary prophylaxis) versus correction (secondary prophylaxis) of facial wrinkles and tackle the question ‘how young is too young for botulinum toxin injections?’.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Jun 1, 2013

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