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Older people and skin: challenging perceptions of the ageing process

Older people and skin: challenging perceptions of the ageing process In this article, the authors will set out to challenge perceptions about older people and skin. The article will examine portrayals of older people and skin, both in the media and nursing literature, and describe the ‘normal’ process of skin ageing and highlight the importance of maintaining skin integrity and effective barrier function for health and wellbeing, particularly in older people. One element of maintaining skin integrity is ensuring that personal hygiene and emollient needs are met. Effective skin hygiene and emollient care will reduce the risk of breakdown, with all its burdensome and costly consequences. The authors will offer a summary of the available evidence base for skin hygiene practices. They will also make a case for nurses considering skin health from a wider societal and human perspective, and identify opportunities to enhance nursing practice through skincare advice and health education for all older people. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Older people and skin: challenging perceptions of the ageing process

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 3 (10): 5 – Dec 2, 2014

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2014.3.10.490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, the authors will set out to challenge perceptions about older people and skin. The article will examine portrayals of older people and skin, both in the media and nursing literature, and describe the ‘normal’ process of skin ageing and highlight the importance of maintaining skin integrity and effective barrier function for health and wellbeing, particularly in older people. One element of maintaining skin integrity is ensuring that personal hygiene and emollient needs are met. Effective skin hygiene and emollient care will reduce the risk of breakdown, with all its burdensome and costly consequences. The authors will offer a summary of the available evidence base for skin hygiene practices. They will also make a case for nurses considering skin health from a wider societal and human perspective, and identify opportunities to enhance nursing practice through skincare advice and health education for all older people.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Dec 2, 2014

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