Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Interpreting clinical papers: a guide to understanding research and data

Interpreting clinical papers: a guide to understanding research and data One of the greatest challenges to all practitioners working in modern healthcare is simply keeping ahead of the tsunami of information that threatens to bury them under a mountain of paper—or perhaps the modern equivalent, an electronic reading list that only ever increases in length. In an article written in the 1990s, Sackett et al estimated then that the required reading for a doctor working in general medicine was equivalent to 19 articles per day, 365 days a year (Sackett et al 1996). In 2014, the advent of the internet has vastly increased the potential information overload. This article discusses the transition from ‘eminence-based medicine’ to ‘evidence-based medicine’, outlines the six levels of the hierarchy of evidence and educates aesthetic nurses on interpreting clinical research papers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Interpreting clinical papers: a guide to understanding research and data

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 3 (8): 5 – Oct 2, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mark-allen-group/interpreting-clinical-papers-a-guide-to-understanding-research-and-2BWALCLmWy
Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2014.3.8.396
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the greatest challenges to all practitioners working in modern healthcare is simply keeping ahead of the tsunami of information that threatens to bury them under a mountain of paper—or perhaps the modern equivalent, an electronic reading list that only ever increases in length. In an article written in the 1990s, Sackett et al estimated then that the required reading for a doctor working in general medicine was equivalent to 19 articles per day, 365 days a year (Sackett et al 1996). In 2014, the advent of the internet has vastly increased the potential information overload. This article discusses the transition from ‘eminence-based medicine’ to ‘evidence-based medicine’, outlines the six levels of the hierarchy of evidence and educates aesthetic nurses on interpreting clinical research papers.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Oct 2, 2014

There are no references for this article.