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Infection control and skin disinfection prior to injectable aesthetic procedures

Infection control and skin disinfection prior to injectable aesthetic procedures Aesthetic treatments are often performed to offer patients an enhanced version of themselves, but it could be argued that outcomes are being compromised by poor skin preparation prior to injectable procedures. A search for consistent evidence-based guidance proved difficult; however, there are certain products which repeatedly surface in the name of effective skin antisepsis, such as chlorhexidine-alcohol and povidone-iodine. The Nursing and Midwifery Council states that its registrants must deliver care based on best practice and the best evidence available. It is therefore the responsibility of all nurses to maintain a high standard of care, not only in the treatments they offer, but also in the entire treatment journey. This means educating patients about their procedure and supporting this with written guidance both before and after treatment. It is also recommended that each aesthetic practitioner uses the best evidence available to establish their own written skin preparation protocol, to ensure consistently high standards of skin decontamination in their practice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Infection control and skin disinfection prior to injectable aesthetic procedures

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 7 (4): 5 – May 2, 2018

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2018.7.4.199
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aesthetic treatments are often performed to offer patients an enhanced version of themselves, but it could be argued that outcomes are being compromised by poor skin preparation prior to injectable procedures. A search for consistent evidence-based guidance proved difficult; however, there are certain products which repeatedly surface in the name of effective skin antisepsis, such as chlorhexidine-alcohol and povidone-iodine. The Nursing and Midwifery Council states that its registrants must deliver care based on best practice and the best evidence available. It is therefore the responsibility of all nurses to maintain a high standard of care, not only in the treatments they offer, but also in the entire treatment journey. This means educating patients about their procedure and supporting this with written guidance both before and after treatment. It is also recommended that each aesthetic practitioner uses the best evidence available to establish their own written skin preparation protocol, to ensure consistently high standards of skin decontamination in their practice.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: May 2, 2018

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