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Hyaluronic acid: essential properties and considerations for aesthetic practice

Hyaluronic acid: essential properties and considerations for aesthetic practice Generally, by the age of 30 years, structural changes start to become noticeable on the face. The redistribution of fat, combined with both the loss of bone and soft tissue volume and decreased dermal elasticity and thickness, contribute to the formation of fine lines, wrinkles and folds. In the past, surgical procedures were the dominant method for tackling signs of facial ageing. However, this two-dimensional technique is giving way to the three-dimensional volume restoration that dermal fillers provide. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is present among all living organisms and plays an integral part in the maintenance and regulation of moisture within tissues, due to its high affinity for water. There are a number of factors affecting the properties of each HA-based filler on the market, including molecular weight, cross-linking, swelling, modulus and particle size and distribution. Each dermal filler is appropriate for different areas and types of treatment. Although there is no single filler that is appropriate for every type of treatment in all patients, correct adjustments of the above properties could lead to the production of a more ‘ideal’ dermal filler. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Hyaluronic acid: essential properties and considerations for aesthetic practice

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 3 (2): 4 – Mar 1, 2014

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2014.3.2.78
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Generally, by the age of 30 years, structural changes start to become noticeable on the face. The redistribution of fat, combined with both the loss of bone and soft tissue volume and decreased dermal elasticity and thickness, contribute to the formation of fine lines, wrinkles and folds. In the past, surgical procedures were the dominant method for tackling signs of facial ageing. However, this two-dimensional technique is giving way to the three-dimensional volume restoration that dermal fillers provide. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is present among all living organisms and plays an integral part in the maintenance and regulation of moisture within tissues, due to its high affinity for water. There are a number of factors affecting the properties of each HA-based filler on the market, including molecular weight, cross-linking, swelling, modulus and particle size and distribution. Each dermal filler is appropriate for different areas and types of treatment. Although there is no single filler that is appropriate for every type of treatment in all patients, correct adjustments of the above properties could lead to the production of a more ‘ideal’ dermal filler.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Mar 1, 2014

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