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Exploring the role of heat shock proteins in radiofrequency energy therapies

Exploring the role of heat shock proteins in radiofrequency energy therapies One of the most common questions asked by those considering radiofrequency treatment is ‘how do radiofrequency energy treatments work to tighten the skin?’. In this article, two industry experts explain the biological mechanism of how heat shock proteins revitalise skin following radiofrequency energy treatments. When tissue is heated or stressed, as occurs after radiofrequency energy treatments, cells naturally begin to produce tiny proteins that stabilise the cell. One of the roles of heat shock proteins is to help newly or improperly formed proteins to fold into their correct shape, as this is vital to their function. For example, collagen is strong because it is comprised of three strands of procollagen bound together—the helper protein that holds the strands in alignment as they bond is a heat shock protein. This paper discusses the various types of heat shock proteins and their roles in tissue regeneration following radiofrequency therapy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Exploring the role of heat shock proteins in radiofrequency energy therapies

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 4 (5): 4 – Jun 2, 2015

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2015.4.5.224
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the most common questions asked by those considering radiofrequency treatment is ‘how do radiofrequency energy treatments work to tighten the skin?’. In this article, two industry experts explain the biological mechanism of how heat shock proteins revitalise skin following radiofrequency energy treatments. When tissue is heated or stressed, as occurs after radiofrequency energy treatments, cells naturally begin to produce tiny proteins that stabilise the cell. One of the roles of heat shock proteins is to help newly or improperly formed proteins to fold into their correct shape, as this is vital to their function. For example, collagen is strong because it is comprised of three strands of procollagen bound together—the helper protein that holds the strands in alignment as they bond is a heat shock protein. This paper discusses the various types of heat shock proteins and their roles in tissue regeneration following radiofrequency therapy.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Jun 2, 2015

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