Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Everyone is talking about…

Everyone is talking about… Last month, the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP) released new guidance in relation to the remote prescribing of prescription-only medicines (POMs) for cosmetic treatments. This follows discussions about the upcoming licensing scheme for non-surgical cosmetic treatments after the Health and Care Bill (2022) was granted royal assent. In addition to this, the Botulinum Toxins and Cosmetic Fillers (Children) Act (2021) that came into force last year shows that momentous change within the sphere of medical aesthetics is no longer on the horizon, but it is now a reality.The JCCP press release (2022) states:‘… in line with the guidance set down by several Professional Statutory Regulators (the General Medical Council and the General Dental Council and in accordance with guidance set down by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society), the JCCP and the CPSA (Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority) have set down their decision not to endorse or permit the remote prescribing of any injectable prescription medicine and medical device when used for non-surgical cosmetic procedures’.While botulinum toxin is the only POM used for cosmetic treatments, it has been recommended that dermal fillers are also considered POMs. However, on 26 June 2022, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) (2022) provided an update on their consultation on amending the scope of UK medical device regulations. It stated that, ‘dermal fillers must only be administered by healthcare professionals’ and ‘dermal fillers should be available on a prescription-only basis’, but concluded that the ‘MHRA is unable to regulate these as prescription-only medicines’ as they are not all ‘classified as a medicinal product’ (MHRA, 2022).As is always the case with such endeavours for change in medical aesthetics, at the heart of the JCCP's recommendation is the aim to safeguard patients and put their safety first, as it recommends that ‘prescribers must not prescribe injectable medicines and devices for non-surgical cosmetic use by telephone, video link, online, at the request of others, for patients whom they have not examined personally ‘face-to-face’. The recommendation has received a positive response from medical aesthetic practitioners and is a definite step in the right direction. To read the press release in full, you can visit tinyurl.com/3cvxpw2u, where an overview of the responsibilities necessary to prescribe ethically and effectively in the medical aesthetics sector is provided. Alternatively, check out the JCCP's latest update in the Journal of Aesthetic Nursing on page 269 to read their views on premises standards.Whether it is prescribing or licencing, one thing is true: 2022 is a momentous year for aesthetic regulation in the UK. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Everyone is talking about…

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 11 (6): 1 – Jul 2, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mark-allen-group/everyone-is-talking-about-BudDzSGeLn
Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2022.11.6.241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Last month, the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP) released new guidance in relation to the remote prescribing of prescription-only medicines (POMs) for cosmetic treatments. This follows discussions about the upcoming licensing scheme for non-surgical cosmetic treatments after the Health and Care Bill (2022) was granted royal assent. In addition to this, the Botulinum Toxins and Cosmetic Fillers (Children) Act (2021) that came into force last year shows that momentous change within the sphere of medical aesthetics is no longer on the horizon, but it is now a reality.The JCCP press release (2022) states:‘… in line with the guidance set down by several Professional Statutory Regulators (the General Medical Council and the General Dental Council and in accordance with guidance set down by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society), the JCCP and the CPSA (Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority) have set down their decision not to endorse or permit the remote prescribing of any injectable prescription medicine and medical device when used for non-surgical cosmetic procedures’.While botulinum toxin is the only POM used for cosmetic treatments, it has been recommended that dermal fillers are also considered POMs. However, on 26 June 2022, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) (2022) provided an update on their consultation on amending the scope of UK medical device regulations. It stated that, ‘dermal fillers must only be administered by healthcare professionals’ and ‘dermal fillers should be available on a prescription-only basis’, but concluded that the ‘MHRA is unable to regulate these as prescription-only medicines’ as they are not all ‘classified as a medicinal product’ (MHRA, 2022).As is always the case with such endeavours for change in medical aesthetics, at the heart of the JCCP's recommendation is the aim to safeguard patients and put their safety first, as it recommends that ‘prescribers must not prescribe injectable medicines and devices for non-surgical cosmetic use by telephone, video link, online, at the request of others, for patients whom they have not examined personally ‘face-to-face’. The recommendation has received a positive response from medical aesthetic practitioners and is a definite step in the right direction. To read the press release in full, you can visit tinyurl.com/3cvxpw2u, where an overview of the responsibilities necessary to prescribe ethically and effectively in the medical aesthetics sector is provided. Alternatively, check out the JCCP's latest update in the Journal of Aesthetic Nursing on page 269 to read their views on premises standards.Whether it is prescribing or licencing, one thing is true: 2022 is a momentous year for aesthetic regulation in the UK.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Jul 2, 2022

There are no references for this article.