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Diagnosis and management of acne vulgaris in aesthetic practice

Diagnosis and management of acne vulgaris in aesthetic practice Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. Although most common among teenagers, acne can also occur in younger patients and can persist into, or develop in, adulthood. Acne presents with a spectrum of non-inflammatory and inflammatory lesions commonly occurring on the face, chest and back. The major goals of acne therapy are the treatment of existing acne lesions, prevention of new lesions, limiting duration of the disorder, and preventing permanent scarring. This article will look at the pathogenesis, clinical features and diagnosis of acne, followed by a discussion of available treatments and aims to encourage aesthetic nurses to include acne diagnosis and management into their portfolio of knowledge and experience, thus effectively incorporating this specialist area of dermatology into their services. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Diagnosis and management of acne vulgaris in aesthetic practice

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 3 (10): 8 – Dec 2, 2014

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2014.3.10.482
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. Although most common among teenagers, acne can also occur in younger patients and can persist into, or develop in, adulthood. Acne presents with a spectrum of non-inflammatory and inflammatory lesions commonly occurring on the face, chest and back. The major goals of acne therapy are the treatment of existing acne lesions, prevention of new lesions, limiting duration of the disorder, and preventing permanent scarring. This article will look at the pathogenesis, clinical features and diagnosis of acne, followed by a discussion of available treatments and aims to encourage aesthetic nurses to include acne diagnosis and management into their portfolio of knowledge and experience, thus effectively incorporating this specialist area of dermatology into their services.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Dec 2, 2014

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