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Body dysmorphic disorder and addiction to medical aesthetic procedures

Body dysmorphic disorder and addiction to medical aesthetic procedures According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or dysmorphophobia, is the preoccupation with an imagined defect in appearance that leads to significant distress and impairments to daily functioning. Due to their lack of insight, individuals with BDD believe that cosmetic procedures will be the solution to their insecurities, even though they rarely get satisfaction from them. Cosmetic procedures can then become an addiction, as patients never reach full satisfaction. In response to this issue, aesthetic practitioners need to identify those presenting with BDD by administering a questionnaire that asks how many cosmetic surgeries the individual has had previously, before continuing with any aesthetic procedure. Those who show signs of BDD can then be referred to mental health professionals for specialised treatments, such as medications, cognitive behavioural therapy, exposure and response prevention, and family support. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Body dysmorphic disorder and addiction to medical aesthetic procedures

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 6 (9): 4 – Nov 2, 2017

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Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2017.6.9.472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or dysmorphophobia, is the preoccupation with an imagined defect in appearance that leads to significant distress and impairments to daily functioning. Due to their lack of insight, individuals with BDD believe that cosmetic procedures will be the solution to their insecurities, even though they rarely get satisfaction from them. Cosmetic procedures can then become an addiction, as patients never reach full satisfaction. In response to this issue, aesthetic practitioners need to identify those presenting with BDD by administering a questionnaire that asks how many cosmetic surgeries the individual has had previously, before continuing with any aesthetic procedure. Those who show signs of BDD can then be referred to mental health professionals for specialised treatments, such as medications, cognitive behavioural therapy, exposure and response prevention, and family support.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Nov 2, 2017

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