Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Adult acne vulgaris: dispelling the myths and exploring the barriers to clinical care

Adult acne vulgaris: dispelling the myths and exploring the barriers to clinical care Acne vulgaris can affect individuals of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Variations in clinical presentation and approaches to acne treatment exist and it is a disease where both the patient and practitioner can be left feeling hopeless and frustrated. Despite acne persisting into adulthood in up to 50% of the population, very few therapeutic studies have been performed in this age group. In addition, there are many myths surrounding the causes of acne. This article examines and dispels the genetic and dietary myth associated with the condition. The psychological impact of acne can be devastating, affecting relationships, self-confidence and even work performance. Quality of life can be seriously debilitated through the additional psychological effects of acne. Aesthetic nurses may well be presented with patients asking for help with the management of their acne who have already been to their GP for help. This article aims to provide an understanding of the barriers to the management of acne in the NHS, including the GP Quality Outcome Framework (QOF) and the lack of education in the medical curriculum. Aesthetic nurses who are competent in the management of acne have the opportunity to offer management and care to acne patients to improve their quality of life. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aesthetic Nursing Mark Allen Group

Adult acne vulgaris: dispelling the myths and exploring the barriers to clinical care

Journal of Aesthetic Nursing , Volume 2 (10): 7 – Jan 1, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mark-allen-group/adult-acne-vulgaris-dispelling-the-myths-and-exploring-the-barriers-to-hEjFPl3KLe
Publisher
Mark Allen Group
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 MA Healthcare Limited
ISSN
2050-3717
eISSN
2052-2878
DOI
10.12968/joan.2013.2.10.476
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acne vulgaris can affect individuals of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Variations in clinical presentation and approaches to acne treatment exist and it is a disease where both the patient and practitioner can be left feeling hopeless and frustrated. Despite acne persisting into adulthood in up to 50% of the population, very few therapeutic studies have been performed in this age group. In addition, there are many myths surrounding the causes of acne. This article examines and dispels the genetic and dietary myth associated with the condition. The psychological impact of acne can be devastating, affecting relationships, self-confidence and even work performance. Quality of life can be seriously debilitated through the additional psychological effects of acne. Aesthetic nurses may well be presented with patients asking for help with the management of their acne who have already been to their GP for help. This article aims to provide an understanding of the barriers to the management of acne in the NHS, including the GP Quality Outcome Framework (QOF) and the lack of education in the medical curriculum. Aesthetic nurses who are competent in the management of acne have the opportunity to offer management and care to acne patients to improve their quality of life.

Journal

Journal of Aesthetic NursingMark Allen Group

Published: Jan 1, 2014

There are no references for this article.