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The Floppy Iris Syndrome – What Urologists and Ophthalmologists Need to Know

The Floppy Iris Syndrome – What Urologists and Ophthalmologists Need to Know Introduction: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract formation are common in older people. Medical management of symptomatic BPH is often preferred to surgical treatment as surgery increases the risk of morbidities, whereas, surgery is the main form of treatment to restore sight in patient with cataract. The clinical treatment of BPH is either alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist alone or combination of alpha reductase inhibitor and alpha adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist. There are four alpha-AR antagonists currently available to treat BPH. The uroselective alpha-blocker tamsulosin is the most commonly used drug among all. Studies showed that the majority of the patients who develop intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) were on tamsulosin. Women are more likely to develop cataract than men and some recent studies showed that tamsulosin is effective in treating female lower urinary tract symptoms and thereby can cause IFIS during cataract surgery. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a critical review of the published articles and abstracts on association of IFIS with alpha-blockers and other medications as well as other medical conditions. Evidence Synthesis: Tamsulosin is the most common cause of formation of IFIS. However, not all patients given tamsulosin develop IFIS and cases have been reported without any tamsulosin treatment. Conclusion: Tamsulosin is a recognized cause to impede mydriasis and lead to IFIS during cataract surgery. Urologist should collaborate with their ophthalmology colleagues and general practitioner during prescribing tamsulosin in patients with history of cataract or waiting for planned cataract surgery. The increasing life expectancy and growth of older people will increase the number of men and women who suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms as well as cataract. Therefore, further research and studies are required to properly understand the relation of alpha blockers and IFIS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Urology Karger

The Floppy Iris Syndrome – What Urologists and Ophthalmologists Need to Know

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Publisher
Karger
Copyright
© 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel
ISSN
1661-7649
eISSN
1661-7657
DOI
10.1159/000338861
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract formation are common in older people. Medical management of symptomatic BPH is often preferred to surgical treatment as surgery increases the risk of morbidities, whereas, surgery is the main form of treatment to restore sight in patient with cataract. The clinical treatment of BPH is either alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist alone or combination of alpha reductase inhibitor and alpha adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist. There are four alpha-AR antagonists currently available to treat BPH. The uroselective alpha-blocker tamsulosin is the most commonly used drug among all. Studies showed that the majority of the patients who develop intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) were on tamsulosin. Women are more likely to develop cataract than men and some recent studies showed that tamsulosin is effective in treating female lower urinary tract symptoms and thereby can cause IFIS during cataract surgery. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a critical review of the published articles and abstracts on association of IFIS with alpha-blockers and other medications as well as other medical conditions. Evidence Synthesis: Tamsulosin is the most common cause of formation of IFIS. However, not all patients given tamsulosin develop IFIS and cases have been reported without any tamsulosin treatment. Conclusion: Tamsulosin is a recognized cause to impede mydriasis and lead to IFIS during cataract surgery. Urologist should collaborate with their ophthalmology colleagues and general practitioner during prescribing tamsulosin in patients with history of cataract or waiting for planned cataract surgery. The increasing life expectancy and growth of older people will increase the number of men and women who suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms as well as cataract. Therefore, further research and studies are required to properly understand the relation of alpha blockers and IFIS.

Journal

Current UrologyKarger

Published: Jan 1, 2012

Keywords: Floppy iris syndrome; Cataract complication; Tamsulosin; Benign prostatic hyperplasia; Alpha adrenergic blocker

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