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Review of the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of low strength steels in oil and gas applications

Review of the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of low strength steels in oil and gas... Hydrogen-Induced Cracking (HIC) is one of several related mechanisms whereby absorbed hydrogen atoms can compromise the integrity of components manufactured of low strength steels. A “low strength steel” is defined as having a maximum hardness of 22 HRC (249 HV). The corresponding maximum tensile strength is of the order of 800 MPa (116 ksi). Steels having localized areas with microhardness in excess of 22 HRC are particularly vulnerable to the development of HIC damage. HIC is a term applied to phenomena which occurs at low temperatures (typically less than about 90 °C), and must not be confused with high temperature hydrogen attack of low strength carbon-manganese and low alloy steels exposed to hot hydrogen gas-containing environments. This review will highlight main factors that affect HIC development or failure by considering the following: (i) Metallurgical factors (effect of materials and microstructures), and (ii) Environmental exposure factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strength, Fracture and Complexity iospress

Review of the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of low strength steels in oil and gas applications

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
1567-2069
eISSN
1875-9262
DOI
10.3233/SFC-180221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hydrogen-Induced Cracking (HIC) is one of several related mechanisms whereby absorbed hydrogen atoms can compromise the integrity of components manufactured of low strength steels. A “low strength steel” is defined as having a maximum hardness of 22 HRC (249 HV). The corresponding maximum tensile strength is of the order of 800 MPa (116 ksi). Steels having localized areas with microhardness in excess of 22 HRC are particularly vulnerable to the development of HIC damage. HIC is a term applied to phenomena which occurs at low temperatures (typically less than about 90 °C), and must not be confused with high temperature hydrogen attack of low strength carbon-manganese and low alloy steels exposed to hot hydrogen gas-containing environments. This review will highlight main factors that affect HIC development or failure by considering the following: (i) Metallurgical factors (effect of materials and microstructures), and (ii) Environmental exposure factors.

Journal

Strength, Fracture and Complexityiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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