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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in public administration: An introduction to a series of articles

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in public administration: An introduction to a series of... Information Infrastructure and Policy 6 (2000) 127–129 IOS Press Wim B.H.J. van de Donk and John Taylor Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands Tel.: +31 13 466 8191/8199/2128; Fax: +31 13 466 8149; E-mail: wim.b.h.j.vddonk@kub.nl GIS: a challenging technology Geographic Information Systems (GIS) represent a promising generation of powerful tools developed with the help of both traditional and new Information- and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Public Administration (e.g., new database technologies, the Internet). Indeed, while discussing the generic applications that every public administrator should master, one commentator explicitly states that the development and use of GISs is on: “(. . . ) the fast track to becoming such a generic application in public administration” [1,3]. Since their first appearance in public administration, GISs have been expected to contribute to a more comprehensive, technocratic and rational mode of policymaking. Some authors (as Carver c.s. in this issue) expect them to enable more effective democratic participation in these policies. Others are pointing at the way these systems, contrary to some widely-held beliefs about the “deterritorializing”-capacities of ICTs in public administration, are causing a re-assessment of the notion of territory in public administration (e.g., Snellen, this issue, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Infrastructure and Policy IOS Press

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in public administration: An introduction to a series of articles

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1383-7605
eISSN
1875-8738
Publisher site
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Abstract

Information Infrastructure and Policy 6 (2000) 127–129 IOS Press Wim B.H.J. van de Donk and John Taylor Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands Tel.: +31 13 466 8191/8199/2128; Fax: +31 13 466 8149; E-mail: wim.b.h.j.vddonk@kub.nl GIS: a challenging technology Geographic Information Systems (GIS) represent a promising generation of powerful tools developed with the help of both traditional and new Information- and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Public Administration (e.g., new database technologies, the Internet). Indeed, while discussing the generic applications that every public administrator should master, one commentator explicitly states that the development and use of GISs is on: “(. . . ) the fast track to becoming such a generic application in public administration” [1,3]. Since their first appearance in public administration, GISs have been expected to contribute to a more comprehensive, technocratic and rational mode of policymaking. Some authors (as Carver c.s. in this issue) expect them to enable more effective democratic participation in these policies. Others are pointing at the way these systems, contrary to some widely-held beliefs about the “deterritorializing”-capacities of ICTs in public administration, are causing a re-assessment of the notion of territory in public administration (e.g., Snellen, this issue,

Journal

Information Infrastructure and PolicyIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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