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Fatigue behavior of composite materials made from waste plastics

Fatigue behavior of composite materials made from waste plastics In this paper fatigue behavior of composite materials made from waste plastics such as polyethylene and polypropylene is summarized. Fatigue strengths of polyethylene and polypropylene matrix composite materials with various kinds of fillers such as fly ash, calcium carbonate, glass fiber, glass powder, talc and wood are demonstrated. Among the composite materials made from pallets by use of newly manufacturing system for waste plastics the polyethylene composite materials with 20 wt% fly ash only showed higher fatigue strength than that of polyethylene waste plastics. However the polypropylene composite materials with fillers such as 25 wt% talc and 20 wt% glass fiber made from injection molding showed higher fatigue strengths than that of polypropylene material. It can be concluded from detailed fracture surface observations that the tight interface between polyethylene and polypropylene matrix and fillers can provide composite materials with high fatigue strength by use of newly developed manufacturing systems for waste plastics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strength, Fracture and Complexity iospress

Fatigue behavior of composite materials made from waste plastics

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1567-2069
eISSN
1875-9262
DOI
10.3233/SFC-2010-0108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper fatigue behavior of composite materials made from waste plastics such as polyethylene and polypropylene is summarized. Fatigue strengths of polyethylene and polypropylene matrix composite materials with various kinds of fillers such as fly ash, calcium carbonate, glass fiber, glass powder, talc and wood are demonstrated. Among the composite materials made from pallets by use of newly manufacturing system for waste plastics the polyethylene composite materials with 20 wt% fly ash only showed higher fatigue strength than that of polyethylene waste plastics. However the polypropylene composite materials with fillers such as 25 wt% talc and 20 wt% glass fiber made from injection molding showed higher fatigue strengths than that of polypropylene material. It can be concluded from detailed fracture surface observations that the tight interface between polyethylene and polypropylene matrix and fillers can provide composite materials with high fatigue strength by use of newly developed manufacturing systems for waste plastics.

Journal

Strength, Fracture and Complexityiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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