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E-Government in Europe: Uniform solutions for all countries?

E-Government in Europe: Uniform solutions for all countries? Information Polity 11 (2006) 189–196 IOS Press Klaus Lenk E-mail: lenk@aon.at 1. Introduction In many respects, E-Government is just a new name for the informatisation of the public sector, which has been going on for several decades now [6]. The use of IT in public administration and in other branches of government (including parliaments and the judiciary) has attained a high level in many countries of the industrialised world. But until recently, there was hardly any political interest in this ongoing and almost invisible process of modernising government. With the announcement of a National Information Infrastructure by US Vice President Al Gore in 1993, this situation changed fundamentally. Gore heralded not only the potential for a renewal of society which an “Information Society” holds. Unlike his follower in Europe, EU Commissioner Martin Bangemann who pursued an agenda of economic liberalisation and of cutting back public services, he related this potential directly to the goal of improving the performance of the public sector. The renewed “Information Society” rhetoric of the last decade and the modernisation of public administration and public policymaking thus seemed to join forces. Yet an insistence on E-Government in a fairly narrow sense distracted many efforts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Polity IOS Press

E-Government in Europe: Uniform solutions for all countries?

Information Polity , Volume 11 (3) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1570-1255
eISSN
1875-8754
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information Polity 11 (2006) 189–196 IOS Press Klaus Lenk E-mail: lenk@aon.at 1. Introduction In many respects, E-Government is just a new name for the informatisation of the public sector, which has been going on for several decades now [6]. The use of IT in public administration and in other branches of government (including parliaments and the judiciary) has attained a high level in many countries of the industrialised world. But until recently, there was hardly any political interest in this ongoing and almost invisible process of modernising government. With the announcement of a National Information Infrastructure by US Vice President Al Gore in 1993, this situation changed fundamentally. Gore heralded not only the potential for a renewal of society which an “Information Society” holds. Unlike his follower in Europe, EU Commissioner Martin Bangemann who pursued an agenda of economic liberalisation and of cutting back public services, he related this potential directly to the goal of improving the performance of the public sector. The renewed “Information Society” rhetoric of the last decade and the modernisation of public administration and public policymaking thus seemed to join forces. Yet an insistence on E-Government in a fairly narrow sense distracted many efforts

Journal

Information PolityIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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