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Building Britain's Future: Digital Britain

Building Britain's Future: Digital Britain Information Polity 14 (2009) 233–234 DOI 10.3233/IP-2009-0178 IOS Press Book Review Building Britain’s Future: Digital Britain. Final Report’ (June 2009), Department for Business Innovation and Skills and Department for Culture, Media and Sport, London. There is an expectation that a report numbering some 239 pages will feature high quality content and substantial critical discussion. Increasingly, though, Government reports have become little more than wordy, lightweight documents characterised by a feel of heady optimism that is presumably meant to sound visionary and inspiring, but that actually has the feel of a ‘glossy PR brochure’. This Report does not disappoint in any of these respects. For Government, Digital Britain is Utopian Britain – All Shall Participate and Dissent Shall be Punished. There is the mantra, there is the soundbite that sums up the overarching message of the Report. Mustapha Mond 1 is alive and well in UK Government. Also lending a feeling of superficiality to the Report is the readiness of the Government to engage with hideous jargon such as ‘not spots’, ‘not a lot spots’, and ‘unconferences’. The trendy feel that this jargon conveys may appeal to the IT converts, but could alienate and disenfranchise wider communities for whom http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Polity IOS Press

Building Britain's Future: Digital Britain

Information Polity , Volume 14 (3) – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1570-1255
eISSN
1875-8754
DOI
10.3233/IP-2009-0178
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information Polity 14 (2009) 233–234 DOI 10.3233/IP-2009-0178 IOS Press Book Review Building Britain’s Future: Digital Britain. Final Report’ (June 2009), Department for Business Innovation and Skills and Department for Culture, Media and Sport, London. There is an expectation that a report numbering some 239 pages will feature high quality content and substantial critical discussion. Increasingly, though, Government reports have become little more than wordy, lightweight documents characterised by a feel of heady optimism that is presumably meant to sound visionary and inspiring, but that actually has the feel of a ‘glossy PR brochure’. This Report does not disappoint in any of these respects. For Government, Digital Britain is Utopian Britain – All Shall Participate and Dissent Shall be Punished. There is the mantra, there is the soundbite that sums up the overarching message of the Report. Mustapha Mond 1 is alive and well in UK Government. Also lending a feeling of superficiality to the Report is the readiness of the Government to engage with hideous jargon such as ‘not spots’, ‘not a lot spots’, and ‘unconferences’. The trendy feel that this jargon conveys may appeal to the IT converts, but could alienate and disenfranchise wider communities for whom

Journal

Information PolityIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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