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Book Review

Book Review Information Polity 21 (2016) 421–424 421 DOI 10.3233/IP-160390 IOS Press Review of Noveck, B. S. (2015). Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing. Harvard University Press. Contrary to the title and, perhaps, to the expectations of some readers, technology plays a secondary role in Beth Simone Noveck’s Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing (2015). Rather, this is a work about the future of democracy. Technology surely plays a critical role in her analysis and she offers several technology-centered proposals for changes in public management, but Noveck is primarily concerned with the ways in which government can and must change to maintain both relevance and legitimacy. One of those needed changes, according to Noveck, is the opening of government to its own citizens. Near the beginning of chapter one, she defines open government as the idea that “. . . governing insti- tutions are not as effective or legitimate as they might be because they operate behind closed doors” (p. 2). This clear, formal definition works but it is not nearly as appealing as her homier formulation, “conversational models of governing” (p. 30). Expressed either way, though, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Polity IOS Press

Book Review

Information Polity , Volume 21 (4): 4 – Jan 1, 2016

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
1570-1255
eISSN
1875-8754
DOI
10.3233/IP-160390
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information Polity 21 (2016) 421–424 421 DOI 10.3233/IP-160390 IOS Press Review of Noveck, B. S. (2015). Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing. Harvard University Press. Contrary to the title and, perhaps, to the expectations of some readers, technology plays a secondary role in Beth Simone Noveck’s Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing (2015). Rather, this is a work about the future of democracy. Technology surely plays a critical role in her analysis and she offers several technology-centered proposals for changes in public management, but Noveck is primarily concerned with the ways in which government can and must change to maintain both relevance and legitimacy. One of those needed changes, according to Noveck, is the opening of government to its own citizens. Near the beginning of chapter one, she defines open government as the idea that “. . . governing insti- tutions are not as effective or legitimate as they might be because they operate behind closed doors” (p. 2). This clear, formal definition works but it is not nearly as appealing as her homier formulation, “conversational models of governing” (p. 30). Expressed either way, though,

Journal

Information PolityIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2016

References