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Reflections on climate politics in a sunburnt country

Reflections on climate politics in a sunburnt country Climate Law 1 (2010) 325–327 DOI 10.3233/CL-2010-015 IOS Press Notes from the field Reflections on climate politics in a sunburnt country Greg Picker1 The Australian polity has shifted dramatically on climate change policy, moving—in less than a year—from a committed bipartisan support for an emissions trading system and strong action on climate change to something that is a reflection of the previous level ambition. The purpose of this note is to briefly explain what has happened in Australia about climate change policy, the implications that this has had for Australia meeting its Kyoto Protocol and 2020 targets, and some thoughts on the future of Australian climate politics and how this may impact Australia in the future. As Australian negotiators prepared to leave for Copenhagen in early December 2009, domestic Australian politics focused on the passage of an emissions trading bill. In a series of dramatic political maneuvers and negotiations, the Labor Government and the Liberal (Conservative) Opposition had reached agreement on draft legislation ending six months of highly contentious political debate. The level of disquiet within the Opposition to this compromise remained very high. Then, on the morning the bill was to be considered in Parliament, there was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law IOS Press

Reflections on climate politics in a sunburnt country

Climate Law , Volume 1 (2) – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.3233/CL-2010-015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Climate Law 1 (2010) 325–327 DOI 10.3233/CL-2010-015 IOS Press Notes from the field Reflections on climate politics in a sunburnt country Greg Picker1 The Australian polity has shifted dramatically on climate change policy, moving—in less than a year—from a committed bipartisan support for an emissions trading system and strong action on climate change to something that is a reflection of the previous level ambition. The purpose of this note is to briefly explain what has happened in Australia about climate change policy, the implications that this has had for Australia meeting its Kyoto Protocol and 2020 targets, and some thoughts on the future of Australian climate politics and how this may impact Australia in the future. As Australian negotiators prepared to leave for Copenhagen in early December 2009, domestic Australian politics focused on the passage of an emissions trading bill. In a series of dramatic political maneuvers and negotiations, the Labor Government and the Liberal (Conservative) Opposition had reached agreement on draft legislation ending six months of highly contentious political debate. The level of disquiet within the Opposition to this compromise remained very high. Then, on the morning the bill was to be considered in Parliament, there was

Journal

Climate LawIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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