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Important Evidence Highlights the Meaning of Teacher-Child Relationships for Child Development

Important Evidence Highlights the Meaning of Teacher-Child Relationships for Child Development In their article on attachment relationships with non-parental caregivers and how it may contribute to public child care, Beckh and Becker-Stoll (2016) first describe important background about research on early parent-child relationships, and how their nature and quality might affect future development of competencies in various areas. They share evidence from some longitudinal studies, in particular those conducted in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study (Sroufe, Egeland, Carlson, & Collins, 2005) and in Germany by Klaus Grossmann and Karin Grossmann and students, important founders of attachment theory and renowned researchers in the field (see for example, Grossmann, Grossmann, & Waters, 2005). With the addition of other longitudinal studies in Israel, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America, the picture becomes even more integrated (Grossmann et al., 2005).Such background information is significant because it sets the ground for understanding the relationships that children form with non-parental caregivers, especially teachers. Important evidence is presented to highlight the meaning of such relationships for the future of healthy development in children. Although attachment theory has been shown to concur most powerfully with parents, we still have some evidence that non-parental care might also have formative significance, as is the case for example http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Developmental Science iospress

Important Evidence Highlights the Meaning of Teacher-Child Relationships for Child Development

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
2192-001X
DOI
10.3233/DEV-16199
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In their article on attachment relationships with non-parental caregivers and how it may contribute to public child care, Beckh and Becker-Stoll (2016) first describe important background about research on early parent-child relationships, and how their nature and quality might affect future development of competencies in various areas. They share evidence from some longitudinal studies, in particular those conducted in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study (Sroufe, Egeland, Carlson, & Collins, 2005) and in Germany by Klaus Grossmann and Karin Grossmann and students, important founders of attachment theory and renowned researchers in the field (see for example, Grossmann, Grossmann, & Waters, 2005). With the addition of other longitudinal studies in Israel, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America, the picture becomes even more integrated (Grossmann et al., 2005).Such background information is significant because it sets the ground for understanding the relationships that children form with non-parental caregivers, especially teachers. Important evidence is presented to highlight the meaning of such relationships for the future of healthy development in children. Although attachment theory has been shown to concur most powerfully with parents, we still have some evidence that non-parental care might also have formative significance, as is the case for example

Journal

International Journal of Developmental Scienceiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2016

References