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Handrail position and shape that best facilitate sit-to-stand movement

Handrail position and shape that best facilitate sit-to-stand movement Background: Sit-to-stand (STS) movement is an important part of the overall pattern of walking and affects social independence. Objective: We examined the kinematics of STS movement using two adjustable handrails. Methods: Seventy-five subjects (25 college students, 25 independent elderly people, and 25 physically challenged elderly people) participated in the study. Five types of handrail positions ('no handrails', 'both high', 'both low', 'high and low' and 'reverse high and low') were evaluated. Kinematic data were collected using a VICON analyzer and a Myosystem was used to collect the electromyographic data. Results: STS movements with high and low handrails in the elderly subjects took the shortest time and showed the largest decrease in torque (15%) compared to no handrails. The 'high and low' position also reduced the loads to the greatest extent. The average time period for STS was reduced by 15 to 30% using the high and low handrails compared to no handrail for all three groups. Conclusion: The `high and low' handrail position best facilitates STS movement in the elderly by reducing the time needed to perform STS movements and by reducing the torque and subsequent wear on the joints and muscles. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation IOS Press

Handrail position and shape that best facilitate sit-to-stand movement

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1053-8127
eISSN
1878-6324
DOI
10.3233/BMR-2012-0308
pmid
22398265
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: Sit-to-stand (STS) movement is an important part of the overall pattern of walking and affects social independence. Objective: We examined the kinematics of STS movement using two adjustable handrails. Methods: Seventy-five subjects (25 college students, 25 independent elderly people, and 25 physically challenged elderly people) participated in the study. Five types of handrail positions ('no handrails', 'both high', 'both low', 'high and low' and 'reverse high and low') were evaluated. Kinematic data were collected using a VICON analyzer and a Myosystem was used to collect the electromyographic data. Results: STS movements with high and low handrails in the elderly subjects took the shortest time and showed the largest decrease in torque (15%) compared to no handrails. The 'high and low' position also reduced the loads to the greatest extent. The average time period for STS was reduced by 15 to 30% using the high and low handrails compared to no handrail for all three groups. Conclusion: The `high and low' handrail position best facilitates STS movement in the elderly by reducing the time needed to perform STS movements and by reducing the torque and subsequent wear on the joints and muscles.

Journal

Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal RehabilitationIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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