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Effect of KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on tumor sidedness and KRAS subtypes

Effect of KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: A systematic review... INTRODUCTION:Metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer (MRCRC) has a poor prognosis. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of different subtypes of KRAS mutation and BRAF mutation in metastatic CRC patients, and evaluate the relationship between the tumor sidedness and prevalence of KRAS and BRAF mutation.METHODS:We searched MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov from January 2010 to July 2020. The data were extracted independently according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). The statistical analysis was done using STATA and Meta-Disk 1.4 applications.RESULTS:Overall, 6699 colorectal cancer patients were included. KRAS and BRAF mutation was reported in 28% and 6% of patients, respectively. The overall prevalence of right primary and left primary metastatic CRC patients with mutated KRAS was 40% and 60%. However, the prevalence BRAF mutated right primary and left primary metastatic CRC patients was 37% and 63%. The overall HR was 2.38 for patients with metastatic CRC who had a mutated type of KRAS. Our study showed a mean overall survival of 35.4 month for KRAS mutant and a 10.12 month survival for BRAF mutant patients with metastatic colorectal cancer patients.CONCLUSION:The prevalence of KRAS and BRAF mutations varied significantly according to the location of the tumor. BRAF mutations are more commonly found in metastatic colorectal cancers on the right side. Liver was the most common site of metastases in patients with mutant KRAS and the mortality of patients with mutant KRAS was 2.3 times higher than the patients with wild types. These results help to better describe the population of mCRC patients and can have implications for improving and organizing anti-EGFR therapies. Further research is needed to assess differences in survival through mutation status and primary tumor location. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Antibodies IOS Press

Effect of KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on tumor sidedness and KRAS subtypes

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 © 2021 – IOS Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1093-2607
eISSN
1875-869X
DOI
10.3233/HAB-210451
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:Metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer (MRCRC) has a poor prognosis. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of different subtypes of KRAS mutation and BRAF mutation in metastatic CRC patients, and evaluate the relationship between the tumor sidedness and prevalence of KRAS and BRAF mutation.METHODS:We searched MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov from January 2010 to July 2020. The data were extracted independently according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). The statistical analysis was done using STATA and Meta-Disk 1.4 applications.RESULTS:Overall, 6699 colorectal cancer patients were included. KRAS and BRAF mutation was reported in 28% and 6% of patients, respectively. The overall prevalence of right primary and left primary metastatic CRC patients with mutated KRAS was 40% and 60%. However, the prevalence BRAF mutated right primary and left primary metastatic CRC patients was 37% and 63%. The overall HR was 2.38 for patients with metastatic CRC who had a mutated type of KRAS. Our study showed a mean overall survival of 35.4 month for KRAS mutant and a 10.12 month survival for BRAF mutant patients with metastatic colorectal cancer patients.CONCLUSION:The prevalence of KRAS and BRAF mutations varied significantly according to the location of the tumor. BRAF mutations are more commonly found in metastatic colorectal cancers on the right side. Liver was the most common site of metastases in patients with mutant KRAS and the mortality of patients with mutant KRAS was 2.3 times higher than the patients with wild types. These results help to better describe the population of mCRC patients and can have implications for improving and organizing anti-EGFR therapies. Further research is needed to assess differences in survival through mutation status and primary tumor location.

Journal

Human AntibodiesIOS Press

Published: Nov 22, 2021

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