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Association of increased C-Reactive Protein and hypocomplementemia with risk factors for thrombosis in women who have susceptibility for poor gestational outcome; importance of preconceptional counseling

Association of increased C-Reactive Protein and hypocomplementemia with risk factors for... This study aimed to investigate the association of increased C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and hypocomplementemia with risk factors for thrombosis such as Factor V Leiden (FVLP) and Prothrombin G20210A polymorphisms (PP), increased Activated Protein C Resistance (APCR) and decreased anti-thrombin III (ATIII) activity in women who have metabolic (MTHFR polymorphisms) and immunological risk factors (autoimmune antibody positivity, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases). All patients (n= 197) were evaluated in terms of risk factors for thrombosis including FVLP, PP, increased APCR, and decreased ATIII activity as well as CRP and complement (C) 3 and C4 levels within a framework of preconceptional care program. Patients with high CRP levels together with hypocomplementemia were included to the study group (n= 13), while women with normal levels of CRP, C3, and C4 were accepted as controls (n= 184). Decreased ATIII activity was found to be statistically more frequent in the study group compared to controls (p= 0.036). There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of the presence of FVLP, PP and increased APCR (p= 0.386, p= 0.462, p= 0.625, respectively). Decreased ATIII activity should be the concern of preconceptional and antenatal care programs in risky patients with increased CRP levels and hypocomplementemia in order to prevent placental inflammation related gestational complications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Antibodies IOS Press

Association of increased C-Reactive Protein and hypocomplementemia with risk factors for thrombosis in women who have susceptibility for poor gestational outcome; importance of preconceptional counseling

Human Antibodies , Volume 29 (4): 6 – Nov 22, 2021

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 © 2021 – IOS Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1093-2607
eISSN
1875-869X
DOI
10.3233/HAB-210452
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the association of increased C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and hypocomplementemia with risk factors for thrombosis such as Factor V Leiden (FVLP) and Prothrombin G20210A polymorphisms (PP), increased Activated Protein C Resistance (APCR) and decreased anti-thrombin III (ATIII) activity in women who have metabolic (MTHFR polymorphisms) and immunological risk factors (autoimmune antibody positivity, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases). All patients (n= 197) were evaluated in terms of risk factors for thrombosis including FVLP, PP, increased APCR, and decreased ATIII activity as well as CRP and complement (C) 3 and C4 levels within a framework of preconceptional care program. Patients with high CRP levels together with hypocomplementemia were included to the study group (n= 13), while women with normal levels of CRP, C3, and C4 were accepted as controls (n= 184). Decreased ATIII activity was found to be statistically more frequent in the study group compared to controls (p= 0.036). There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of the presence of FVLP, PP and increased APCR (p= 0.386, p= 0.462, p= 0.625, respectively). Decreased ATIII activity should be the concern of preconceptional and antenatal care programs in risky patients with increased CRP levels and hypocomplementemia in order to prevent placental inflammation related gestational complications.

Journal

Human AntibodiesIOS Press

Published: Nov 22, 2021

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