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Prioritising areas for the development and delivery of government e-content and e-services: an appraisal of the Alberta SuperNet

Prioritising areas for the development and delivery of government e-content and e-services: an... Governments are beginning to commit substantial sums of money to systems for the delivery of electronic public services. These promise citizens improved access to public services and round the clock one-source access to government for all, regardless of their location and levels of mobility. However, identifying priorities and determining how much public money should be committed to particular types of public Electronic Services (e-services) remain problematic. Choice Experiments (CEs) have begun to be used to estimate the value of non-market goods, including quantifying the use and non-use values provided by components of a complex public service. Here we use a CE to determine priorities by forecasting the relative market value of the types of government e-services proposed to be delivered to Alberta households via the Alberta SuperNet. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electronic Government, an International Journal Inderscience Publishers

Prioritising areas for the development and delivery of government e-content and e-services: an appraisal of the Alberta SuperNet

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Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1740-7494
eISSN
1740-7508
DOI
10.1504/EG.2008.016635
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Governments are beginning to commit substantial sums of money to systems for the delivery of electronic public services. These promise citizens improved access to public services and round the clock one-source access to government for all, regardless of their location and levels of mobility. However, identifying priorities and determining how much public money should be committed to particular types of public Electronic Services (e-services) remain problematic. Choice Experiments (CEs) have begun to be used to estimate the value of non-market goods, including quantifying the use and non-use values provided by components of a complex public service. Here we use a CE to determine priorities by forecasting the relative market value of the types of government e-services proposed to be delivered to Alberta households via the Alberta SuperNet.

Journal

Electronic Government, an International JournalInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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