Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Architectural accessibility and reading complexity of US state e-government for older adult users

Architectural accessibility and reading complexity of US state e-government for older adult users The US aging population can benefit greatly from e-government resources because of their immediate availability. Unfortunately, older adults may encounter web barriers preventing access to e-government resources. This study assessed potential barriers associated with state e-government in terms of link descriptions, navigational depth, and reading complexity. Results showed that most state sites were not readily accessible by older adults. Only 5% had descriptive homepage links navigating directly to senior resources. Fifteen percent required navigation through four or more secondary pages to access senior resources. Over 91% of sampled content targeting seniors had a reading grade level higher than eighth grade. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electronic Government, an International Journal Inderscience Publishers

Architectural accessibility and reading complexity of US state e-government for older adult users

Loading next page...
 
/lp/inderscience-publishers/architectural-accessibility-and-reading-complexity-of-us-state-e-tHuhotqhYw
Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1740-7494
eISSN
1740-7508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The US aging population can benefit greatly from e-government resources because of their immediate availability. Unfortunately, older adults may encounter web barriers preventing access to e-government resources. This study assessed potential barriers associated with state e-government in terms of link descriptions, navigational depth, and reading complexity. Results showed that most state sites were not readily accessible by older adults. Only 5% had descriptive homepage links navigating directly to senior resources. Fifteen percent required navigation through four or more secondary pages to access senior resources. Over 91% of sampled content targeting seniors had a reading grade level higher than eighth grade.

Journal

Electronic Government, an International JournalInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.