Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A contingency model of citizens' attitudes toward e–government use

A contingency model of citizens' attitudes toward e–government use This paper explores the contingency effects of citizens' demographic and relationship quality characteristics on the connection between e–government attitudes (as measured by satisfaction) and e–government acceptance (as measured by visit frequency and number of transactions). A series of statistical analyses of responses collected from a sample of 268 citizens uncover several noteworthy findings. The study reveals that the relationship between e–government attitudes and visit frequency and the number of completed transactions differs according to citizens' education and gender as well as their perceptions of the trustworthiness and value of e–government. In particular, it is interesting to note that trust in e–government plays a stronger role in moderating the relationship between e–government attitudes and the number of completed transactions, whereas perceived e–government value exerts a stronger role in moderating the relationship between attitudes and visit frequency. The practical and research implications of these results are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electronic Government, an International Journal Inderscience Publishers

A contingency model of citizens' attitudes toward e–government use

Loading next page...
 
/lp/inderscience-publishers/a-contingency-model-of-citizens-attitudes-toward-e-government-use-GrtQXlbAy4
Publisher
Inderscience Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. All rights reserved
ISSN
1740-7494
eISSN
1740-7508
DOI
10.1504/EG.2013.051276
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the contingency effects of citizens' demographic and relationship quality characteristics on the connection between e–government attitudes (as measured by satisfaction) and e–government acceptance (as measured by visit frequency and number of transactions). A series of statistical analyses of responses collected from a sample of 268 citizens uncover several noteworthy findings. The study reveals that the relationship between e–government attitudes and visit frequency and the number of completed transactions differs according to citizens' education and gender as well as their perceptions of the trustworthiness and value of e–government. In particular, it is interesting to note that trust in e–government plays a stronger role in moderating the relationship between e–government attitudes and the number of completed transactions, whereas perceived e–government value exerts a stronger role in moderating the relationship between attitudes and visit frequency. The practical and research implications of these results are discussed.

Journal

Electronic Government, an International JournalInderscience Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.