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The Relevance of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit to the Process of Contemporary Psychoanalysis

The Relevance of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit to the Process of Contemporary Psychoanalysis Do changes in psychoanalytic technique represent progress in knowledge or are they for the most part a sideways movement in tune with the particular changes in the socioeconomic milieu of the day? Hegel raised the question in the area of philosophy when discussing the stages in the development of self-consciousness. For him this was an inevitable development toward a greater and greater self-understanding, going through various phases until Absolute Spirit (Mind) became completely cognizant of itself. This metaphysical conception was the cornerstone of Hegel's thought as first presented in his chaotic masterpiece, Phenomenology of Spirit. In this article I will examine his philosophical vision as expressed in that masterpiece, compare it with that of Freud, and discuss aspects of it that are pertinent to the practice of contemporary psychoanalysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

The Relevance of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit to the Process of Contemporary Psychoanalysis

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2008.36.4.677
pmid
19113961
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Do changes in psychoanalytic technique represent progress in knowledge or are they for the most part a sideways movement in tune with the particular changes in the socioeconomic milieu of the day? Hegel raised the question in the area of philosophy when discussing the stages in the development of self-consciousness. For him this was an inevitable development toward a greater and greater self-understanding, going through various phases until Absolute Spirit (Mind) became completely cognizant of itself. This metaphysical conception was the cornerstone of Hegel's thought as first presented in his chaotic masterpiece, Phenomenology of Spirit. In this article I will examine his philosophical vision as expressed in that masterpiece, compare it with that of Freud, and discuss aspects of it that are pertinent to the practice of contemporary psychoanalysis.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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