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The Meaning of a Metapsychology as an Instrument for “Explaining”

The Meaning of a Metapsychology as an Instrument for “Explaining” The author points out how some psychoanalytical concepts that were considered as fundamental and unchangeable are actually changing. Child Psychoanalysis with its “infant psychoanalysis” (babies and parents) and other psychological sciences have contributed to this development. Nevertheless, many psychoanalysts have not taken this new knowledge into account. The author ascribes it to the lack of an epistemological distinction between “describing” (facts) and “explaining” (hypotheses), that is, between what are known as discoveries in psychoanalysis and what are theories instead. No theory can be a discovery but rather a hypothetical conceptual instrument trying to explain discoveries. Freud's Metapsychology is a hypothetical instrument which needs to be changed today, since the progress of psychoanalysis and other sciences allows for better instruments. The author wishes for studies which may outline other explicit metapsychologies that may better explicate what is being observed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

The Meaning of a Metapsychology as an Instrument for “Explaining”

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© 2011 The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2011.39.4.651
pmid
22168630
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The author points out how some psychoanalytical concepts that were considered as fundamental and unchangeable are actually changing. Child Psychoanalysis with its “infant psychoanalysis” (babies and parents) and other psychological sciences have contributed to this development. Nevertheless, many psychoanalysts have not taken this new knowledge into account. The author ascribes it to the lack of an epistemological distinction between “describing” (facts) and “explaining” (hypotheses), that is, between what are known as discoveries in psychoanalysis and what are theories instead. No theory can be a discovery but rather a hypothetical conceptual instrument trying to explain discoveries. Freud's Metapsychology is a hypothetical instrument which needs to be changed today, since the progress of psychoanalysis and other sciences allows for better instruments. The author wishes for studies which may outline other explicit metapsychologies that may better explicate what is being observed.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Dec 1, 2011

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