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The Family Doctor: Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Tightly Knit Communities

The Family Doctor: Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Tightly Knit Communities Although unusual, psychodynamic psychiatrists engage in the practice of treating multiple members, and constellations of members, of families with psychodynamic psychotherapy as well as other treatment modalities. Such clinicians are considered the “Family Psychiatrist.” Psychological characteristics of such families who cannot be referred to other clinicians are articulated. The literature on psychotherapy in small rural communities is reviewed as having relevance to define the ethical issues that arise in such treatments. These issues include: maintaining therapeutic neutrality; creating functional, flexible, and appropriate boundaries; maintaining confidentiality; promoting patient autonomy and growth; as well as managing conflicts of interest. Relevant countertransference issues are examined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

The Family Doctor: Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Tightly Knit Communities

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© 2011 The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2011.39.1.169
pmid
21434750
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although unusual, psychodynamic psychiatrists engage in the practice of treating multiple members, and constellations of members, of families with psychodynamic psychotherapy as well as other treatment modalities. Such clinicians are considered the “Family Psychiatrist.” Psychological characteristics of such families who cannot be referred to other clinicians are articulated. The literature on psychotherapy in small rural communities is reviewed as having relevance to define the ethical issues that arise in such treatments. These issues include: maintaining therapeutic neutrality; creating functional, flexible, and appropriate boundaries; maintaining confidentiality; promoting patient autonomy and growth; as well as managing conflicts of interest. Relevant countertransference issues are examined.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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