Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Models, Metaphors and Psychopathology: Commentary on Javanbakht's “Bugs and Bowls”

Models, Metaphors and Psychopathology: Commentary on Javanbakht's “Bugs and Bowls” David A. S. Garfield, Nutan A. Vaidya, and Piro Rjepaj "The theory of bugs and bowls," as outlined by Javanbakht (2005), is, in essence a psychobiological metaphor for understanding psychotic processes. It attempts to bridge psychological and biological explanations for psychotic phenomena by using the metaphor of "bugs and bowls." In this metaphor, the bowl represents the organism's capacity to contain its own inner experience. The bowl is described psychologically, in analytic terms, vis-à-vis traditional ego function and its action of repression. Interestingly, the superego is left out in this discussion. Inner experience, in this regard, corresponds to the wishes and fears of the unconscious. Repressed pathological memories are included in this explanation as well. On the biological side, neuroanatomic, neurochemical, and cortical-subcortical circuits and neural networks are reviewed and folded into the metaphor. The author cites a variety of different literatures to beef up his proposal that "bugs and bowls" is a utilitarian model for the modern clinician. Although we are quite fond of the analogy, there are a few things about it that "bug" us. MODELS, METAPHORS, AND ANALOGIES According to WordNet lexical database, a "model" is a theoretical account or a framework. "It is a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

Models, Metaphors and Psychopathology: Commentary on Javanbakht's “Bugs and Bowls”

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/models-metaphors-and-psychopathology-commentary-on-javanbakht-s-bugs-6uRSmiO5eH
Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2005.33.2.377
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David A. S. Garfield, Nutan A. Vaidya, and Piro Rjepaj "The theory of bugs and bowls," as outlined by Javanbakht (2005), is, in essence a psychobiological metaphor for understanding psychotic processes. It attempts to bridge psychological and biological explanations for psychotic phenomena by using the metaphor of "bugs and bowls." In this metaphor, the bowl represents the organism's capacity to contain its own inner experience. The bowl is described psychologically, in analytic terms, vis-à-vis traditional ego function and its action of repression. Interestingly, the superego is left out in this discussion. Inner experience, in this regard, corresponds to the wishes and fears of the unconscious. Repressed pathological memories are included in this explanation as well. On the biological side, neuroanatomic, neurochemical, and cortical-subcortical circuits and neural networks are reviewed and folded into the metaphor. The author cites a variety of different literatures to beef up his proposal that "bugs and bowls" is a utilitarian model for the modern clinician. Although we are quite fond of the analogy, there are a few things about it that "bug" us. MODELS, METAPHORS, AND ANALOGIES According to WordNet lexical database, a "model" is a theoretical account or a framework. "It is a

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.