Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction to “Reconciliation: The Continuing Role of Theory” by Leo Rangell and “American Psychoanalysis Today: Plurality of Orthodoxies” by Arnold M. Cooper

Introduction to “Reconciliation: The Continuing Role of Theory” by Leo Rangell and “American... INTRODUCTION TO RANGELL AND COOPER ECKARDT Marianne Horney Eckardt These two articles are of special significance. Leo Rangell is aware that the very acts of the Academy's inviting him to present this article and of his ready acceptance is a political event beyond the article's scholarly contribution. This reflects that for some years now we have moved into a period of rapprochement. Diversity of ideas is acknowledged. While welcomed by many, others regard it with dismay. Both speakers see the urgent need to place our pluralism into a larger, more open­ended framework and they confront us with the challenges this entails. Rangell observes that new ideas have been introduced by a process of elimination and replacement rather than by seeing new ideas as evolving and adding new perspectives to basic concepts. This is a very important point. In order to gain legitimacy, new perspectives have tended to be dramatized by being cast as cores of new theoretical stories, emphasizing differences. Rangell's heart longs for a comprehensive inclusive psychoanalytic theory. He characterizes himself as a "developed Freudian," that is, one who has retained insights and formulations that have endured over time and has added such new ones as he http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

Introduction to “Reconciliation: The Continuing Role of Theory” by Leo Rangell and “American Psychoanalysis Today: Plurality of Orthodoxies” by Arnold M. Cooper

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/introduction-to-reconciliation-the-continuing-role-of-theory-by-leo-35E2cS4ByU
Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
Subject
Frontline
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2008.36.2.213
pmid
18593252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION TO RANGELL AND COOPER ECKARDT Marianne Horney Eckardt These two articles are of special significance. Leo Rangell is aware that the very acts of the Academy's inviting him to present this article and of his ready acceptance is a political event beyond the article's scholarly contribution. This reflects that for some years now we have moved into a period of rapprochement. Diversity of ideas is acknowledged. While welcomed by many, others regard it with dismay. Both speakers see the urgent need to place our pluralism into a larger, more open­ended framework and they confront us with the challenges this entails. Rangell observes that new ideas have been introduced by a process of elimination and replacement rather than by seeing new ideas as evolving and adding new perspectives to basic concepts. This is a very important point. In order to gain legitimacy, new perspectives have tended to be dramatized by being cast as cores of new theoretical stories, emphasizing differences. Rangell's heart longs for a comprehensive inclusive psychoanalytic theory. He characterizes himself as a "developed Freudian," that is, one who has retained insights and formulations that have endured over time and has added such new ones as he

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.