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Frontline

Frontline Matthew Tolchin In an elegant, thoughtful, and lucid article, "Some Comments on the Nature and Use of the Concept of Psyche in Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy," Crittenden Brookes examines the concept of "psyche," a concept utterly basic and ubiquitous in our field. He rests on a phenomenologic base, which seems entirely consistent with his scientific perspective, and additionally finds himself conducting an inquiry into the concept of "mind." He touches on "soul" and "spirit," but finds them largely peripheral to his quest. I think that readers will relish the opportunity to assess for themselves how satisfying are his concluding definitions and principles. In my reading, this Jungian analyst thinks and writes quite comfortably in the tradition of ego-psychology. In "Orthodox Judaism and Psychoanalysis: Toward Dialogue and Reconciliation," Mariam Cohen and Joel Gereboff bring together their expertise in psychoanalysis, religious studies, and philosophy. They draw on an exemplary acquaintance with the literature of their respective fields of study, offering a sociologic and philosophic discussion of interactions between orthodox Judaism and psychoanalysis. They point out the mutual hostility that has largely prevailed and seek possibilities for constructive dialogue. While it is not their main thrust, there are recurring and gratifying http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.32.2.255.35284
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Matthew Tolchin In an elegant, thoughtful, and lucid article, "Some Comments on the Nature and Use of the Concept of Psyche in Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy," Crittenden Brookes examines the concept of "psyche," a concept utterly basic and ubiquitous in our field. He rests on a phenomenologic base, which seems entirely consistent with his scientific perspective, and additionally finds himself conducting an inquiry into the concept of "mind." He touches on "soul" and "spirit," but finds them largely peripheral to his quest. I think that readers will relish the opportunity to assess for themselves how satisfying are his concluding definitions and principles. In my reading, this Jungian analyst thinks and writes quite comfortably in the tradition of ego-psychology. In "Orthodox Judaism and Psychoanalysis: Toward Dialogue and Reconciliation," Mariam Cohen and Joel Gereboff bring together their expertise in psychoanalysis, religious studies, and philosophy. They draw on an exemplary acquaintance with the literature of their respective fields of study, offering a sociologic and philosophic discussion of interactions between orthodox Judaism and psychoanalysis. They point out the mutual hostility that has largely prevailed and seek possibilities for constructive dialogue. While it is not their main thrust, there are recurring and gratifying

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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