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Foreword to “Elements of Dynamics V: Resiliency and the Narrative” by Elizabeth Bromley

Foreword to “Elements of Dynamics V: Resiliency and the Narrative” by Elizabeth Bromley David V. Forrest For this installment of the series, I am pleased to have invited my former resident supervisee at Columbia, Elizabeth Bromley, MD, to consider positive mental health as resilience. She is already an acknowledged expert in normative studies, and she is currently engaged in anthropological studies in addition to her clinical work in Los Angeles. Vaillant's (2003) article, "Mental Health," in which he enumerates six models developed in the past 30 years, appears after a generation of historically unprecedented assaults upon traditional concepts. We tend to forget that a time traveler from post­World War II America, like people in many traditional cultures worldwide whose improbable approval we desire, would be severely alienated by what is now believed to be normal and healthy. It is a still touchy subject in many quarters. At that time health was largely a male prerogative and linked to strength, with menstrual, climacteric, frail women the "weaker sex," consigned to the 3 k's, Kindern, Küche, und Kirche (children, kitchen, and church). The Victorian ideals of mental hygiene, with sexual continence and sublimation of unhealthy, base, filthy instincts, gave way to a mental health as the Playboy ideal of sexual health, orgastic capability, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

Foreword to “Elements of Dynamics V: Resiliency and the Narrative” by Elizabeth Bromley

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2005.33.2.385
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David V. Forrest For this installment of the series, I am pleased to have invited my former resident supervisee at Columbia, Elizabeth Bromley, MD, to consider positive mental health as resilience. She is already an acknowledged expert in normative studies, and she is currently engaged in anthropological studies in addition to her clinical work in Los Angeles. Vaillant's (2003) article, "Mental Health," in which he enumerates six models developed in the past 30 years, appears after a generation of historically unprecedented assaults upon traditional concepts. We tend to forget that a time traveler from post­World War II America, like people in many traditional cultures worldwide whose improbable approval we desire, would be severely alienated by what is now believed to be normal and healthy. It is a still touchy subject in many quarters. At that time health was largely a male prerogative and linked to strength, with menstrual, climacteric, frail women the "weaker sex," consigned to the 3 k's, Kindern, Küche, und Kirche (children, kitchen, and church). The Victorian ideals of mental hygiene, with sexual continence and sublimation of unhealthy, base, filthy instincts, gave way to a mental health as the Playboy ideal of sexual health, orgastic capability,

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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