Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Extreme Beauty: A Developmental Perspective on the Identity Formation of a Fashion Model

Extreme Beauty: A Developmental Perspective on the Identity Formation of a Fashion Model One of the tasks of adolescence is for the individual to adopt a realistic self-image, consistent with her limitations and attributes. The process to reach this task is complicated by adolescent mechanisms to regulate self-esteem, which involve unrealistic identifications with specific peers and with her peer group. I present the case of a fashion model whose adolescent process was stilted by living in an artificial environment that did not allow her to develop a realistic self-image. This problem became more pronounced as she aged and could not find activities and interests that allowed her to feel accomplished. A psychodynamic psychotherapy enabled her to synthesize a new self-image that had aspects derived from her mother and her nanny, the most important figures of her childhood. The process was first to allow her to explore in the transference aspects she saw as repulsive and integrate them with others that she felt were desirable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

Extreme Beauty: A Developmental Perspective on the Identity Formation of a Fashion Model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/extreme-beauty-a-developmental-perspective-on-the-identity-formation-8ak8FjjcQ4
Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© 2010 The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2010.38.2.219
pmid
20528135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the tasks of adolescence is for the individual to adopt a realistic self-image, consistent with her limitations and attributes. The process to reach this task is complicated by adolescent mechanisms to regulate self-esteem, which involve unrealistic identifications with specific peers and with her peer group. I present the case of a fashion model whose adolescent process was stilted by living in an artificial environment that did not allow her to develop a realistic self-image. This problem became more pronounced as she aged and could not find activities and interests that allowed her to feel accomplished. A psychodynamic psychotherapy enabled her to synthesize a new self-image that had aspects derived from her mother and her nanny, the most important figures of her childhood. The process was first to allow her to explore in the transference aspects she saw as repulsive and integrate them with others that she felt were desirable.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2010

There are no references for this article.