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Correspondence

Correspondence To the Editor: My appreciation for Richard D. Chessick's "Psychoanalytic Peregrinations IV: What Is Phenomenology?" (which appeared in this journal, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 673­691) for the depth and density of his tour through this philosophical perspective. When I was a medical student and resident in the late 1960s and 1970s, I learned to direct psychodrama from Jorge Valles, M.D. Valles did amazing work with chronic alcoholics. He introduced me to the existentialists and phenomenologists, especially Husserl. The phenomenological perspective proved particularly helpful in conducting psychodrama therapy. It facilitated the exquisite detailed attention to "setting the scene." It is this quality of attention that may be crucial to the effectiveness of psychodrama therapy. Valles would never allow other patients in the large group to analyze or criticize the patient at the share-back phase that concluded each psychodrama, but they could share their experiences insofar as they related to what had occured in the psychodrama therapy session. A phenomenological point of view assisted patients in more thoroughly appreciating these experiences. As I pursued learning psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, I have always thought of phenomenology as an existential corrective to premature interpretation and as a help in not excessively imposing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.31.4.721.23007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor: My appreciation for Richard D. Chessick's "Psychoanalytic Peregrinations IV: What Is Phenomenology?" (which appeared in this journal, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 673­691) for the depth and density of his tour through this philosophical perspective. When I was a medical student and resident in the late 1960s and 1970s, I learned to direct psychodrama from Jorge Valles, M.D. Valles did amazing work with chronic alcoholics. He introduced me to the existentialists and phenomenologists, especially Husserl. The phenomenological perspective proved particularly helpful in conducting psychodrama therapy. It facilitated the exquisite detailed attention to "setting the scene." It is this quality of attention that may be crucial to the effectiveness of psychodrama therapy. Valles would never allow other patients in the large group to analyze or criticize the patient at the share-back phase that concluded each psychodrama, but they could share their experiences insofar as they related to what had occured in the psychodrama therapy session. A phenomenological point of view assisted patients in more thoroughly appreciating these experiences. As I pursued learning psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, I have always thought of phenomenology as an existential corrective to premature interpretation and as a help in not excessively imposing

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Dec 1, 2003

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