Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Commentary on “Jihad, McWorld and Enactment in the Postmodern Mental Health World” by Eric M. Plakun

Commentary on “Jihad, McWorld and Enactment in the Postmodern Mental Health World” by Eric M. Plakun Alan Kagan This is a carefully and beautifully articulated paper dealing with the reality of the insurance company as a present third object in the psychotherapeutic situation. It is a presence that must be recognized and to which the clinician must relate in some fashion, even though the analytic dyad or the individuals comprising it may have negative or mixed feelings about it. On reflection, this "third" party is always present in any treatment, be it in the form of managed care company, wealthy family, Medicaid, trust fund, or economically deprived circumstances of the patient's life. Frequently, for the psychoanalyst of former days dealing with financially comfortable clients, this third object functions as a benign, noninterfering presence, providing nurture without interference, a kind of "good-enough" Winnicottian "father." The object's significance is appreciated but it makes no demands in any distracting or overly stressful way, and can be easily invisibilized. Nevertheless, this does not mean that the third object is absent. In today's economic circumstances, matters have changed for many of us, and there is a necessity for us to at least give attention to and acknowledge the financial reality as objectified here in managed care. Interestingly, Eric Plakun http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

Commentary on “Jihad, McWorld and Enactment in the Postmodern Mental Health World” by Eric M. Plakun

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/commentary-on-jihad-mcworld-and-enactment-in-the-postmodern-mental-8mnLIqWUWp
Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.30.3.357.21964
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alan Kagan This is a carefully and beautifully articulated paper dealing with the reality of the insurance company as a present third object in the psychotherapeutic situation. It is a presence that must be recognized and to which the clinician must relate in some fashion, even though the analytic dyad or the individuals comprising it may have negative or mixed feelings about it. On reflection, this "third" party is always present in any treatment, be it in the form of managed care company, wealthy family, Medicaid, trust fund, or economically deprived circumstances of the patient's life. Frequently, for the psychoanalyst of former days dealing with financially comfortable clients, this third object functions as a benign, noninterfering presence, providing nurture without interference, a kind of "good-enough" Winnicottian "father." The object's significance is appreciated but it makes no demands in any distracting or overly stressful way, and can be easily invisibilized. Nevertheless, this does not mean that the third object is absent. In today's economic circumstances, matters have changed for many of us, and there is a necessity for us to at least give attention to and acknowledge the financial reality as objectified here in managed care. Interestingly, Eric Plakun

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.