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Book Reviews

Book Reviews Edited by César A. Alfonso, M.D. and Joseph R. Silvio, M.D. Literature and the Brain, by Norman N. Holland. The PsyArt Foundation, Gainesville, FL, 2009, 457 pp. Norman N. Holland, the Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar Emeritus at the University of Florida and faculty member of the McKnight Brain Institute, is the author of 15 books on the psychology of the arts. In this work he attempts to address the question of why we respond with real emotion to works of literature that we know are not real. He turns to neuroscience for his answers, and in doing so, he also provides a summary of our contemporary understanding of how the brain works to provide a mind that determines who we are and what we perceive. Written in an informal first person narrative style, his book is easy to read for both the professional and non-professional, and is filled with useful information for both. Holland begins by observing that when we read a story or a poem or when we watch a movie or a play and become "transported," our mind functions abnormally. It suspends our reality testing and actions while allowing us to respond with real emotions to what http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© 2011 The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2011.39.2.375
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Edited by César A. Alfonso, M.D. and Joseph R. Silvio, M.D. Literature and the Brain, by Norman N. Holland. The PsyArt Foundation, Gainesville, FL, 2009, 457 pp. Norman N. Holland, the Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar Emeritus at the University of Florida and faculty member of the McKnight Brain Institute, is the author of 15 books on the psychology of the arts. In this work he attempts to address the question of why we respond with real emotion to works of literature that we know are not real. He turns to neuroscience for his answers, and in doing so, he also provides a summary of our contemporary understanding of how the brain works to provide a mind that determines who we are and what we perceive. Written in an informal first person narrative style, his book is easy to read for both the professional and non-professional, and is filled with useful information for both. Holland begins by observing that when we read a story or a poem or when we watch a movie or a play and become "transported," our mind functions abnormally. It suspends our reality testing and actions while allowing us to respond with real emotions to what

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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