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A Workshop Model for Educating Medical Practitioners about Optimal Treatment of Difficult-to-Manage Patients: Utilization of Transference-Countertransference

A Workshop Model for Educating Medical Practitioners about Optimal Treatment of... Some patients are unable to participate in a good, mutually cooperative relationship with their primary care doctors. They may have long-standing psychosocial difficulties exacerbated by chronic, painful, or life-threatening illnesses. Some may have somatic symptoms that they define as evidence only of an identified illness but which are reflections of psychic misery with roots in their thoughts, feelings, and relationships. This article describes a Workshop approach to teaching those patients' physicians how to make diagnostic use of their own “gut reactions” to understand the common dynamics of the doctor- patient relationship; to understand the psychological aspects of various physical symptoms; and manage challenging patients to optimize their quality of life, cost-effectiveness of treatment and minimize physician “burnout.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic Psychiatry Guilford Press

A Workshop Model for Educating Medical Practitioners about Optimal Treatment of Difficult-to-Manage Patients: Utilization of Transference-Countertransference

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Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
© The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry
ISSN
1546-0371
DOI
10.1521/jaap.2008.36.4.661
pmid
19113960
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Some patients are unable to participate in a good, mutually cooperative relationship with their primary care doctors. They may have long-standing psychosocial difficulties exacerbated by chronic, painful, or life-threatening illnesses. Some may have somatic symptoms that they define as evidence only of an identified illness but which are reflections of psychic misery with roots in their thoughts, feelings, and relationships. This article describes a Workshop approach to teaching those patients' physicians how to make diagnostic use of their own “gut reactions” to understand the common dynamics of the doctor- patient relationship; to understand the psychological aspects of various physical symptoms; and manage challenging patients to optimize their quality of life, cost-effectiveness of treatment and minimize physician “burnout.”

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis & Dynamic PsychiatryGuilford Press

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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