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Wii‐based Movement Therapy benefits stroke patients with low and very low movement ability

Wii‐based Movement Therapy benefits stroke patients with low and very low movement ability Purpose – Stroke patients with low and very low functional movement are not usually considered suitable for rehabilitation. Without therapy the more‐affected side will not improve and may lose any residual function. Poor movement ability reduces independence and limits the social engagement of such patients. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether Wii‐based Movement Therapy was suitable and beneficial for stroke patients with low and very low movement ability. Design/methodology/approach – In total, 13 patients aged 22‐77 years and three months to 21 years post‐stroke completed the standardised 14‐day protocol of Wii‐based Movement Therapy. Therapy is a structured and targeted programme, tailored to the individual needs and deficits of each patient. Functional ability was assessed using a suite of tools. Increased use of the more‐affected hand and arm in everyday life was assessed using the Quality of Movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log. Findings – Functional movement of the more‐affected hand and arm improved by 40 per cent on the Fugl‐Meyer Assessment. Hand‐use in everyday tasks more than doubled and improvements were also seen in lower‐limb function, balance, and cardiovascular function. Qualitative improvements in psychological status were also noted. Practical implications – The paper demonstrates that stroke patients with low and very low movement ability post‐stroke can benefit from upper‐limb rehabilitation. Wii‐based Movement Therapy is a viable and effective option with high patient compliance. Originality/value – The patients in this study became less disabled. Improving movement ability of stroke survivors will not only increase their independence in activities of daily living but will also reduce the burden of care on patients, their families and the community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

Wii‐based Movement Therapy benefits stroke patients with low and very low movement ability

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/SCN-04-2013-0018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Stroke patients with low and very low functional movement are not usually considered suitable for rehabilitation. Without therapy the more‐affected side will not improve and may lose any residual function. Poor movement ability reduces independence and limits the social engagement of such patients. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether Wii‐based Movement Therapy was suitable and beneficial for stroke patients with low and very low movement ability. Design/methodology/approach – In total, 13 patients aged 22‐77 years and three months to 21 years post‐stroke completed the standardised 14‐day protocol of Wii‐based Movement Therapy. Therapy is a structured and targeted programme, tailored to the individual needs and deficits of each patient. Functional ability was assessed using a suite of tools. Increased use of the more‐affected hand and arm in everyday life was assessed using the Quality of Movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log. Findings – Functional movement of the more‐affected hand and arm improved by 40 per cent on the Fugl‐Meyer Assessment. Hand‐use in everyday tasks more than doubled and improvements were also seen in lower‐limb function, balance, and cardiovascular function. Qualitative improvements in psychological status were also noted. Practical implications – The paper demonstrates that stroke patients with low and very low movement ability post‐stroke can benefit from upper‐limb rehabilitation. Wii‐based Movement Therapy is a viable and effective option with high patient compliance. Originality/value – The patients in this study became less disabled. Improving movement ability of stroke survivors will not only increase their independence in activities of daily living but will also reduce the burden of care on patients, their families and the community.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 9, 2013

Keywords: Cardiovascular fitness; Compliance; Hemiparesis; Stroke rehabilitation; Wii‐based Movement Therapy

References