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Valuation, diversity and cultural mis‐match: immigration in New Zealand

Valuation, diversity and cultural mis‐match: immigration in New Zealand Purpose – This paper aims to examine the economic effect of immigration, in particular, government's ability to select human capital that benefits the economy. Design/methodology/approach – The effects of recent migration to New Zealand are examined, drawing on government statistics. Outcomes are contrasted with policy intentions, and the effect of diversity is considered before examining the economic effect on Auckland city. Findings – The government's assessment of human capital does not reflect market assessment. Reasons include systemic abuse, government valuation of qualifications that are not transferable, and insufficient value placed on language, culture, nor time required for adaptation. The best performing immigrants are those with similar cultures to the dominant NZ ethnic group. Research limitations/implications – More research is needed to quantify impacts, however migration can also be linked to some barriers to growth including congestion costs and diversion of investment to low growth areas. Practical implications – Government policies need to recognise culture is not neutral and the economic benefits of diversity may vary in time and region. Social implications – Failure to recognise culture results in unemployment and under‐employment while migrants endure un‐met expectations. Migrants not assessed for human capital also exhibit cultural mis‐match, and is in danger of creating an emerging underclass. Originality/value – There is a need to distinguish between economic leading immigrants and economic followers. Migrants from different cultures can lead economic growth by developing export markets but the market for such migrants can get saturated. The effects of migration change over time and each situation requires its own analysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Asia Business Studies Emerald Publishing

Valuation, diversity and cultural mis‐match: immigration in New Zealand

Journal of Asia Business Studies , Volume 5 (1): 21 – Jan 18, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1558-7894
DOI
10.1108/15587891111100822
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the economic effect of immigration, in particular, government's ability to select human capital that benefits the economy. Design/methodology/approach – The effects of recent migration to New Zealand are examined, drawing on government statistics. Outcomes are contrasted with policy intentions, and the effect of diversity is considered before examining the economic effect on Auckland city. Findings – The government's assessment of human capital does not reflect market assessment. Reasons include systemic abuse, government valuation of qualifications that are not transferable, and insufficient value placed on language, culture, nor time required for adaptation. The best performing immigrants are those with similar cultures to the dominant NZ ethnic group. Research limitations/implications – More research is needed to quantify impacts, however migration can also be linked to some barriers to growth including congestion costs and diversion of investment to low growth areas. Practical implications – Government policies need to recognise culture is not neutral and the economic benefits of diversity may vary in time and region. Social implications – Failure to recognise culture results in unemployment and under‐employment while migrants endure un‐met expectations. Migrants not assessed for human capital also exhibit cultural mis‐match, and is in danger of creating an emerging underclass. Originality/value – There is a need to distinguish between economic leading immigrants and economic followers. Migrants from different cultures can lead economic growth by developing export markets but the market for such migrants can get saturated. The effects of migration change over time and each situation requires its own analysis.

Journal

Journal of Asia Business StudiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 18, 2011

Keywords: Immigration; Human capital; Diversification; National cultures; New Zealand

References