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Using choice‐based‐experiments to support real estate design decisions

Using choice‐based‐experiments to support real estate design decisions Purpose – In the real estate industry, as well as in other mature markets, producers seek to improve their comparative advantage by correctly addressing the needs and expectations of future users; when projects involve public financial investment (e.g. public/private partnerships), such participation may help to legitimate resource allocation. In this respect few quantitative approaches, affiliated to the study of demand, are able to evaluate the trade‐off that is given between the preferences of individuals when they are faced to choose a single alternative, as is usual in real estate and urban projects. The purpose of this paper is to report the initial results of a research study with the objective of investigating the extent to which techniques used in the design of goods and services could be used to consider future users' preferences on the design processes of real estate developments, such as those promoted by public‐private partnerships in which the inclusion of people's opinion become central for commercial and political reasons. Design/methodology/approach – This article seeks to evaluate the extent to which conjoint analysis, a technique affiliated with designing goods and services through future user/consumer participation, may be used as a support tool in making real estate decisions. This method, born out of the field of marketing analysis, is based on choice experiments and the results are analyzed with conventional multinomial regression models, and can be rooted in “characteristics theory of value” and “behaviorism”. Findings – The results suggest that although this method is helpful in finding the relative relevance of each of the attributes in the projects evaluated, it is not sufficiently clear to: determine the attributes to evaluate; understand the deep reasons motivating preferences; or anticipate future needs that go unnoticed by potential users/buyers in their everyday perceptions. Therefore, this technique is far superior to typical evaluation surveys on independent attributes. However, it is insufficient in the context of intrinsically complex processes. Originality/value – Although intensively used in the design of short‐life consumption services and products, conjoint analysis has been scarcely used on long‐life goods such as urban premises; in this article this technique is used for first time in the framework of a type of public/private brownfield redevelopment project in Catalonia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of European Real Estate Research Emerald Publishing

Using choice‐based‐experiments to support real estate design decisions

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1753-9269
DOI
10.1108/17539261311312979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – In the real estate industry, as well as in other mature markets, producers seek to improve their comparative advantage by correctly addressing the needs and expectations of future users; when projects involve public financial investment (e.g. public/private partnerships), such participation may help to legitimate resource allocation. In this respect few quantitative approaches, affiliated to the study of demand, are able to evaluate the trade‐off that is given between the preferences of individuals when they are faced to choose a single alternative, as is usual in real estate and urban projects. The purpose of this paper is to report the initial results of a research study with the objective of investigating the extent to which techniques used in the design of goods and services could be used to consider future users' preferences on the design processes of real estate developments, such as those promoted by public‐private partnerships in which the inclusion of people's opinion become central for commercial and political reasons. Design/methodology/approach – This article seeks to evaluate the extent to which conjoint analysis, a technique affiliated with designing goods and services through future user/consumer participation, may be used as a support tool in making real estate decisions. This method, born out of the field of marketing analysis, is based on choice experiments and the results are analyzed with conventional multinomial regression models, and can be rooted in “characteristics theory of value” and “behaviorism”. Findings – The results suggest that although this method is helpful in finding the relative relevance of each of the attributes in the projects evaluated, it is not sufficiently clear to: determine the attributes to evaluate; understand the deep reasons motivating preferences; or anticipate future needs that go unnoticed by potential users/buyers in their everyday perceptions. Therefore, this technique is far superior to typical evaluation surveys on independent attributes. However, it is insufficient in the context of intrinsically complex processes. Originality/value – Although intensively used in the design of short‐life consumption services and products, conjoint analysis has been scarcely used on long‐life goods such as urban premises; in this article this technique is used for first time in the framework of a type of public/private brownfield redevelopment project in Catalonia.

Journal

Journal of European Real Estate ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: May 3, 2013

Keywords: Choice experiments; Market study; Conjoint analysis; Real estate; Spain; Brownfield sites; Development; Design

References