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Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy

Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy TG Editorial 10,2 It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the second issue of the tenth volume of Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy. Over the years, the constant update of the journal’s scope to advocate theoretical as well as empirical research has led to an increase in the quality of submissions and citations. The papers in this issue of TGPPP provide a rich contextual background in the area of public policy and administration, understanding the significance of social media in the public sector, information exchange between networked actors in public administration, transforming government into more collaborative, innovative and open government, e-Rulemaking, government agencies or private sectors organisations converting huge volumes of crime data to useful information, e-Participation and open government reforms. This issue commences with a viewpoint by Adam Okulicz-kozaryn, entitled “Happiness Research for Public Policy and Administration”. This viewpoint introduces happiness research for public policy and administration scholars and practitioners. The published literature indicates that happiness can be used as a “yardstick” to support public policy – this is not a new idea – it has already been proposed by Veenhoven (1988) and progresses this perspective. Happiness can be defined as people’s evaluations of their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/TG-03-2016-0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TG Editorial 10,2 It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the second issue of the tenth volume of Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy. Over the years, the constant update of the journal’s scope to advocate theoretical as well as empirical research has led to an increase in the quality of submissions and citations. The papers in this issue of TGPPP provide a rich contextual background in the area of public policy and administration, understanding the significance of social media in the public sector, information exchange between networked actors in public administration, transforming government into more collaborative, innovative and open government, e-Rulemaking, government agencies or private sectors organisations converting huge volumes of crime data to useful information, e-Participation and open government reforms. This issue commences with a viewpoint by Adam Okulicz-kozaryn, entitled “Happiness Research for Public Policy and Administration”. This viewpoint introduces happiness research for public policy and administration scholars and practitioners. The published literature indicates that happiness can be used as a “yardstick” to support public policy – this is not a new idea – it has already been proposed by Veenhoven (1988) and progresses this perspective. Happiness can be defined as people’s evaluations of their

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 16, 2016

References